Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stage two pressure sore - what to expect

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Stage two pressure sore - what to expect

    I didn't realize the air was too low in my roho hybrid cushion, so I have a pretty nasty pressure sore now for the first time. Part of it is red and open like a popped blister and the rest is pretty dark bruising. It's on my left ischial(?). The right side is just red, maybe stage one. I have been in bed ever since finding out last night and am waiting on my doctor to call back.

    So I thought I would post on here and see what others who have had this happen have had to do as far as bladder/bowel/shower etc. go? I'm assuming I'm gonna be stuck here for weeks, just need to know what to expect.

    I also have a ride designs cushion. Could I use this to get up and around the house since my ischials/pressure sore would be floating in the hole that's cut out in the cushion?

    #2
    Its gonna suck! But i think you knew that. As far as bladder can you have a foley temporarily put in? Bowels stick a disposable chuck under you and do program on side. Shower are sponge baths
    T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

    Comment


      #3
      You need to stay off the area completely. That means NO sitting or lying on that spot. I agree that a foley is a good alternative for being in bed, but if you can avoid it, do so. Bowel program needs to be done on your left side. And know that it will take a little more time to get results.

      You need to drink at least 2 liters (quarts) of fluid- preferably most of it water. And your diet should be high in protein, higher in calories and fiber. Turn at least every two hours. And have someone check that area at least twice a day.

      Good luck! Let us know how you are doing.

      CKF
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks. I have an appointment at a wound care center Thursday. Until then, is there anything specific I should be using on the sore like neosporin, etc. and should I keep it covered with a gauze all the time?

        I know you said no sitting on that spot, but if I got in my chair and went in the kitchen for a couple minutes to get something to eat and went back to bed, would that do much harm? Didn't know how strict I need to be.

        And what about using the ride cushion that floats the pressure sore?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Brad09 View Post
          Thanks. I have an appointment at a wound care center Thursday. Until then, is there anything specific I should be using on the sore like neosporin, etc. and should I keep it covered with a gauze all the time?

          I know you said no sitting on that spot, but if I got in my chair and went in the kitchen for a couple minutes to get something to eat and went back to bed, would that do much harm? Didn't know how strict I need to be.

          And what about using the ride cushion that floats the pressure sore?
          Getting up to get something to eat, may not set you back much as long as you go right back to bed to eat. Can someone bring food to you in the AM to tide you over for a couple meals at a time. How about a small ice chest with packaged protein drinks etc. in your room that you can reach.

          I don't know anything about the ride cushion. I do know that cushions that use a cut out can transfer pressure to other parts of your bottom, causing increased pressure in other areas. Be careful.

          Good luck. These things take time.

          All the best,
          GJ

          Comment


            #6
            As far as a covering if its open yes keep it covered with a dry dressing for now till you are seen then follow their guidelines.
            T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

            Comment


              #7
              Getting up for 10-15 minutes will probably not effect the area, but GJ's suggestions are good ones. I don't know much about the RIDE cushion, but he is correct - there unfortunately is not any cushion, that by itself that will prevent problems, no matter what the manufacturer says. I am concerned about the areas that the pressure is transferred to. I would wait to use it until you see the Wound Care Specialist.

              Keep it clean, dry and covered for now. Change the dressing twice a day - if for no other reason than it forces someone to look at the wound. It does not take long for wounds to change for the worse. If you have drainage, than you may want to change it more frequently.

              Let us know what the Wound Care Specialist says.

              Good luck!

              CKF
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                A pressure sore can form in just a few hours, however it will take a lot lot longer to heal. The best thing to do is make sure that your comfortable in bed, you got television, computer, things to do and keep you busy throughout the day. You'll find that within a few days you'll settle in and get used to staying in bed and it won't be so bad. If you've got a pressure sore that has been caused directly from sitting than sitting on it for any period of time can only cause harm. Mind you, I don't know if you've been pressure mapped, Roho do claim that you can still sit up on a stage 2-3 pressure sore and it will heal. However, that will probably Only work if your mapping is completely blue, no yellows or red hot spots whatsoever. I'm not sure I would like to be the one to advise someone to do this just in case it went Pete Tong. I think a lot of people would actually be surprised to see that their mapping isn't quite as good as they think it is.
                Tetraplegic & Spinal Injury Site

                Comment


                  #9
                  No sitting! It I not worth the risk. Mother biggest problem besides the pressure issue is that 10-15 minutes suddenly becomes 30-40 minutes. The whole, let me do just one more thing issue.
                  ckf
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks for all the responses. The wound care doc said it was stage two, but didn't look horrible. He said obviously to keep pressure off. I asked about sitting on the toilet since the pressure sore sits on the inside of the rim, and he said that was fine. He wants me to keep it dry and covered, and to change the bandage at least once a day. I was expecting there to be some kind of cream to put on it, like I have had to do with burns. He said getting up in the chair to get something to eat/ect. was fine but I didn't need to be sitting for more than 5-10 minutes. So I guess I will be on the bed/couch for the next few weeks. He didn't give me an estimated time for it to heal since everyone heals differently, but he said it would be weeks not months. I already have one week out of the way, so hopefully it will get easier as they go by. Thanks again for all the advice.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Take care and let us know how you are doing.
                      ckf
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Well it's been three weeks now and I've been totally off of it all day every day and the doc told me yesterday that it's gonna be at least another four weeks probably longer. This is insane. I had no idea this was gonna take months, especially for a stage two. Is this normal or am I healing a lot slower than most people?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          The ischial tuberosity is the bone that lies beneath this sore. It is part of the cause. Pressure from the inside (bone) pressure from the outside (flattened ROHO cushion)
                          Wounds heal when many factors come into play - 1) good blood flow to the wound---happens when there is lack of pressure, swelling and infection 2) nutrition and protein stores - good to get and albumin and pre albumin (liver function tests) that can tell what your protein stores are in your liver, 3) proper dressing for the wound - all based on the condition of the wound - if there is slough then a debriding agent is needed; if it is pink but slow a product with silver in it can help as an antimicrobial; 4) other medical conditions ----if you are a diabetic it's going to take longer to heal a wound; if you have poor circulation it's going to take longer to heal.

                          Good luck If the wound is stalled, your wound team should consider another product for a dressing or consider an xray of the pelvis and subsequent MRI to check for born infection aka osteomyelitis.

                          Stay off the wound as much as you can, get adjustments to your cushion-use the tilt and recline feature on your w/c, and have a good protein intake. Good luck

                          pbr
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Although it wasn't a Pressure sore I did the equivalent of a stage 2 wound by shearing the skin off a big toe when I did a chair to floor transfer on July 15, I didn't get discharged from the wound clinic care until after labour day. I'm 45 years old, 45 years post (My SCI is congenital) As a result of that wound I had 3 days of IV antibiotics, initially wound care was 3 times a week, then it went to two times a week. So yes it takes time.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                              The ischial tuberosity is the bone that lies beneath this sore. It is part of the cause. Pressure from the inside (bone) pressure from the outside (flattened ROHO cushion)
                              Wounds heal when many factors come into play - 1) good blood flow to the wound---happens when there is lack of pressure, swelling and infection 2) nutrition and protein stores - good to get and albumin and pre albumin (liver function tests) that can tell what your protein stores are in your liver, 3) proper dressing for the wound - all based on the condition of the wound - if there is slough then a debriding agent is needed; if it is pink but slow a product with silver in it can help as an antimicrobial; 4) other medical conditions ----if you are a diabetic it's going to take longer to heal a wound; if you have poor circulation it's going to take longer to heal.

                              Good luck If the wound is stalled, your wound team should consider another product for a dressing or consider an xray of the pelvis and subsequent MRI to check for born infection aka osteomyelitis.

                              Stay off the wound as much as you can, get adjustments to your cushion-use the tilt and recline feature on your w/c, and have a good protein intake. Good luck

                              pbr
                              Thanks for the response. You mention circulation having an effect, would getting on my standing frame help at all along those lines?

                              Since sitting on my ride forward cushion totally floats my IT's so that no pressure is on them, is there any harm when I do have to get in my chair occasionally?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X