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    Pressure Sore on Ankle

    I noticed a quarter-sized red spot on my ankle this morning. So at night I will try to keep pressure off of it. I currently wear those heavy boots they give you in acute rehab. But during the day I wear TED hose and I'm wondering if the compression from wearing them could be aggravating the pressure sore? What should I do to heal this sore? Thank you.

    #2
    A thread started last week entitled "Blisters on foot !" speaks volumes about keeping anything that can cause pressure off once a sore develops. The original poster was also wearing compression hose when he developed skin breakdown.
    We were advised to use Prevalon pressure-relieving heel protectors at night instead of the hard PRAFO boots to reduce the risk of ankle bone sores.

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      #3
      A couple of years ago I had bad sores on both ankles.

      What i did at night that really helped was to buy a couple of those inflatable 'kids arm floaties'. I would put them on my legs just above the sores, thus keeping pressure off the ankles and still getting air to the skin. Since they're round I could still roll side to side without any more trouble than usual.

      The wound care center, that I was going to for treatment of the sores, was impressed with this solution to the problem, plus most floaties are very inexpensive to replace when they get a leak.

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        #4
        You need to keep pressure off the area. The hose could be aggravating it.
        CWO
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          Not only should you keep the pressure off, but also try to keep the foot elevated. Have you been seen by a wound care specialist? It may be a good idea since feet are difficult at best to heal.
          CKF
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            Not only should you keep the pressure off, but also try to keep the foot elevated. Have you been seen by a wound care specialist? It may be a good idea since feet are difficult at best to heal.
            CKF
            Susqu -- I just bought a pair of floaties on amazon. It sounds like a great idea to keep ankles off the bed. Thanks.

            CKF -- Thank you for responding. No, I have not been to a specialist. Maybe I will though. I'm not on bed rest either. Should I be? During the day, I'm in my chair and I have Ted hose on.

            I don't know how to remove pressure from ankles completely at night. I'm going to try arm floaties on my leg, but until then, I don't know what to do. What would a nurse do if I were in a hospital?

            Comment


              #7
              You can be up if you can keep pressure off the ankle and the foot elevated, at least periodically during the day. Do NOT wear TED hose on that foot - it can lead to more problems.

              You can float your foot on a pillow - just make sure that the ankle is not touching the pillow or the bed.

              CKF
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you! So no ted hose. I will keep all pressure off starting tonight. I noticed that the red/pink spot on my ankle has turned brown. The skin has not broken or anything. Does turning brown usually mean that it is getting worse or healing?

                Comment


                  #9
                  It means that you have bruising there and possibly dead tissue. If you do not see any improvement after the weekend, I would encourage you to see a health care provider - preferably a wound care specialist. SOmeone that understands pressure wounds and spinal cord injury is ideal, but I am aware that is not always a possibility.
                  CKF
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'm so glad to see this thread right now. I have been fighting with a quarter sizedpressure sore on my right ankle for almost 6 months now. I've tried everything...well, almost everything.for a while I was elevating my foot with a pillow but I now have a half dollar size the brown spot on the back of my calf not to mention thumb size hard lump now that will not go away.

                    I'm going to try the floaties idea. I haven't tried that yet.

                    I do wear Ted hose during the day. if I do not that Leg from the knee down gets full of fluid and the foot can get as big as a football. the left leg does not have this problem. nobody has been able to figure out why one swells and one does not

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                      #11
                      Are you a complete or incomplete injury?
                      ckf
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                        #12
                        complete. My legs have gotten to the point where they layflat opposite of each other instead of pointing up like a normal person.

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                          #13
                          Well, that blew my theory. Sorry, I can 't think of anything else.
                          ckf
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            in case anybody is wondering, this is what it looks like
                            http://i.imgur.com/Ks2RNUs.jpg it's actually widened by a millimeter or two since last week. in the six months that I've been battling this it's healed twice but for some reason keeps opening back up.

                            don't worry CKF, even mywound care doctor got frustrated at one point.

                            I have taken 2 camping out in my room with my legs propped up on my bed to keep the swelling out of my feet

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I wonder if there are some small tunnels in that wound. That would explain it opening up twice.
                              just a thought.

                              ckf
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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