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Aw s#(*! Shingles.

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  • Aw s#(*! Shingles.

    A couple of days ago I got a small red blotch on my forehead. I just got back from the doc. It is full blown shingles. My wife is off to the drugstore to pick up some acyclovir and prednisone. At this point there is not too much discomfort. That may be because I am already on tramidol and amitriptyline for other pain. The biggest concern is that it extends into my eyelid and it can cause major problems if it invades the eye itself.

    Yes, with everything going on in my life these past few years the vaccine was not a priority. I procrastinated and am paying for it. "Hell, I am a quad so I probably could not feel it if I did get it" was easy to buy into. I never gave a thought about my head. Everyone I knew who had it had it on their trunk. Lesson learned. Because it can recur I will get the vaccine as soon as this episode is over.

    So you oldies out there, do not push your luck. Get the vaccine asap. Do not imitate 55. I am not a good role model. lol But as one of my teachers once said, "You can learn as much from a bad example as a good one as long as you know which you are dealing with."
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  • #2
    Boo! I always get it right on my spine. Such a painful experience. Hope yours goes away soon!
    DFW TEXAS- T-10 since March 20th, 1994

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    • #3
      Good luck, hope it clears out quick.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow. sorry to hear this, theres so many things that can go wrong it's unreal. I had the vaccine done last summer even though I'm only 54 years old, can't remember how long it's good for? Darn. I hope it does not spread too much and goes away quickly.
        "Life is about how you
        respond to not only the
        challenges you're dealt but
        the challenges you seek...If
        you have no goals, no
        mountains to climb, your
        soul dies".~Liz Fordred

        Comment


        • #5
          Very sorry to hear you have shingles and hope things clear up soon without complications.

          Good public safety announcement about getting the shingles vaccine. In 2011, the FDA ruled that you can get Zostavax ( the shingles vaccine) at age 50, instead of waiting until age 60.

          You run about a 30% chance of getting shingles a second time, but you can get the shingles vaccine after this bout with the disease to help prevent a recurrence.

          While we are talking older adult vaccinations, it would be a good time to mention that any one over 65 should get Pneunovax (PPV23), the pneumococcal vaccination for adults.

          All the best,
          GJ

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
            A couple of days ago I got a small red blotch on my forehead. I just got back from the doc. It is full blown shingles. My wife is off to the drugstore to pick up some acyclovir and prednisone. At this point there is not too much discomfort. That may be because I am already on tramidol and amitriptyline for other pain. The biggest concern is that it extends into my eyelid and it can cause major problems if it invades the eye itself.

            Yes, with everything going on in my life these past few years the vaccine was not a priority. I procrastinated and am paying for it. "Hell, I am a quad so I probably could not feel it if I did get it" was easy to buy into. I never gave a thought about my head. Everyone I knew who had it had it on their trunk. Lesson learned. Because it can recur I will get the vaccine as soon as this episode is over.

            So you oldies out there, do not push your luck. Get the vaccine asap. Do not imitate 55. I am not a good role model. lol But as one of my teachers once said, "You can learn as much from a bad example as a good one as long as you know which you are dealing with."
            Sorry to hear this.

            To others reading this, shingles does not just target the senior crowd. I had a case of it in my mid-'20s on my abdomen (thankfully I couldn't feel it!) and know of another SCI, around 40 years old, who got a horrible case of it on his face.

            Though there's no way to say precisely for how long, if you've had shingles, once recovered you probably have natural immunity for approximately 10 years. I got the vaccine about 2 years ago (51 at the time) and it was covered by insurance.
            stephen@bike-on.com

            Comment


            • #7
              I have been seriously considering the shingles vaccine. Whooping cough as well.

              I hope you clear up quickly.
              Alan

              Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
                Wow. sorry to hear this, theres so many things that can go wrong it's unreal. I had the vaccine done last summer even though I'm only 54 years old, can't remember how long it's good for? Darn. I hope it does not spread too much and goes away quickly.
                Because the vaccine just came into use in 2006 they do not know how long at will last. They know it is still effective at 6 years post-vaccination.
                You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                See my personal webpage @
                http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                  Sorry to hear this.

                  To others reading this, shingles does not just target the senior crowd. I had a case of it in my mid-'20s on my abdomen (thankfully I couldn't feel it!) and know of another SCI, around 40 years old, who got a horrible case of it on his face.

                  Though there's no way to say precisely for how long, if you've had shingles, once recovered you probably have natural immunity for approximately 10 years. I got the vaccine about 2 years ago (51 at the time) and it was covered by insurance.
                  I also had it in my 20's around my waist and it was itchy and hurt like hell at the same time. I thought it was a rash from something(I worked at Kraft Foods back then)at work. Went to the nurse and I was escorted out of the factory and was off for two weeks before I could be cleared to go back and work. Never even heard of shingles back then, now it's all over the T.V. commercials.

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                  • #10
                    I got them in my mid thirties, they gave me a shitload of valtrex and they went away fairly quickly.

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                    • #11
                      Sending healing thoughts your way!

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                      • #12
                        I didn't know this vaccine even existed. Thanks for letting us know.

                        I hope you get well soon. Hopefully the medicine will help you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Shingles vaccine is not a guarantee, but it significantly decreases your risk for shingles (it is about 68% effective). Everyone over the age of 50-60 should discuss the pros and cons of getting it with their provider. I got it myself as soon as I turned 60, and my insurance covered it 100%. I saw my father go through nearly 20 years of daily pain with post-herpatic neuropathy after having shingles in his late 60s, and hope that it does not happen to me.

                          Much of the research about this vaccine was done at the VA Medical Center where I work.

                          Here is some additional information about this vaccine from the CDC.

                          http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/...es/default.htm

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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