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    Recurrent UTIs

    Other than vetricyn, any suggestions for beating recurrent UTIs? Chad gets them serially, never having more than a few weeks break between them and it's really getting old. He drinks a TON of water, and I mean ALOT of water, so that variable isn't really in play. Other ideas?
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

    #2
    if it is every few weeks then the next one needs to be treated for longer. eg a 14 day course. how do you manage his bladder? it may help to use the vetericyn as a wash prep step to keep things clean.
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
    http://www.elportavoz.com/

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      #3
      Frequent and recurrent urinary tract infections that you describe should be evaluated by an infectious disease doctor.

      If I recall correctly, Chad is managing his bladder with a suprapubic. How have you been (or have you been) using Vetericyn on a regular basis.

      All the best,
      GJ

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        #4
        Sorry, I should have been more specific. He has an SP cath, we change it every 4 weeks (I do it). The SP has been in for about 5 years now, he didn't get this many infections with intermittent cathing, but I just could not handle 4-6 hour round the clock cathing. When he has an infection, he is treated with 2x longer course than recommended for "regular" people, and he tests clean after each course .... but then he gets a new infection a few weeks later. It's very frustrating.
        Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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          #5
          Originally posted by zillazangel View Post
          Sorry, I should have been more specific. He has an SP cath, we change it every 4 weeks (I do it). The SP has been in for about 5 years now, he didn't get this many infections with intermittent cathing, but I just could not handle 4-6 hour round the clock cathing. When he has an infection, he is treated with 2x longer course than recommended for "regular" people, and he tests clean after each course .... but then he gets a new infection a few weeks later. It's very frustrating.
          try instill the vet and using it to clean the area around the sp daily and on his penis too.
          "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
          http://www.elportavoz.com/

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            #6
            Amy, when was his last cystoscope? Is he prone to stones? Any slime or sediment? Is it always the same organism?

            Any time Jim has a UTI I always re-evaluate my cleaning technique. I don't use Vetericyn but am manic about cleaning. It's been about one and a half years clean since the last episode, which ended up being stones which were unseen on ultrasound and x-ray. Deb

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              #7
              Originally posted by lilsister View Post
              Amy, when was his last cystoscope? Is he prone to stones? Any slime or sediment? Is it always the same organism?

              Any time Jim has a UTI I always re-evaluate my cleaning technique. I don't use Vetericyn but am manic about cleaning. It's been about one and a half years clean since the last episode, which ended up being stones which were unseen on ultrasound and x-ray. Deb

              If the stones were unseen on an ultrasound and x-ray, how were they finally detected? I've had a negative ultrasound, but I keep getting recurrent UTIs, and it's getting really old. I have an appointment to see my urologist for a cystoscope coming up. I also have a lot of slime & sediment no matter how much fluid I drink.

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                #8
                Originally posted by zillazangel View Post
                Other than vetricyn, any suggestions for beating recurrent UTIs?
                Have you tried d-mannose? I would suggest a heaping teaspoon of the powder dissolved in a glass of water once a week. I would not bother with the capsules, as I think the dose is too small.

                There is no downside risk that I am aware of, and the expense at this dosage is minimal. It is currently selling for about $16 for 3 ounces of powder.
                T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by retto76 View Post
                  If the stones were unseen on an ultrasound and x-ray, how were they finally detected? I've had a negative ultrasound, but I keep getting recurrent UTIs, and it's getting really old. I have an appointment to see my urologist for a cystoscope coming up. I also have a lot of slime & sediment no matter how much fluid I drink.
                  I had the same problem with have undetected stones. I had recurring UTIs and ended up getting a cystoscopy where my doctor found 13 stones. I had a CT before that where they didn't find anything, so it just wasn't until he had eyes on them that he knew they were there.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by gac3rd View Post
                    Have you tried d-mannose? I would suggest a heaping teaspoon of the powder dissolved in a glass of water once a week. I would not bother with the capsules, as I think the dose is too small.

                    There is no downside risk that I am aware of, and the expense at this dosage is minimal. It is currently selling for about $16 for 3 ounces of powder.
                    if he is a diabetic, then yes there is a downside as mannose is a sugar.
                    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
                    http://www.elportavoz.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by crypticgimp View Post
                      if he is a diabetic, then yes there is a downside as mannose is a sugar.
                      And, d-mannose is only effect against e. coli.

                      What bacteria has been responsible for Chad's infections?

                      All the best,
                      GJ
                      Last edited by gjnl; 7 Jan 2013, 1:18 PM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        When I was struggling with chronic UTI my Uro prescribed Gentimycin (sp?) as a daily irrigation. Worked very well. Now, I have some on hand, for "as needed". Maybe twice a year my pee will cloud up, get stinky, but no fever or other symptoms. I'll irrigate daily for a week, or so, and be back to normal (usually after 1st couple days, but Uro orders were 1 week, as needed.). Been my protocol for ~ 4 years now, and no full blown UTIs.
                        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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                          #13
                          His last cytoscope was about 2 years ago. I'll ask about doing it again re: stones, that is a good idea. The bug is often, but not always, pseudomonas, other times it's klebsiella, now and then it's e coli. I'll also ask about a gent irrigation.
                          Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The stones were seen per cystoscope. Before they were found the only suggestion by the doc was irrigation. I didn't want to add another procedure which would not get at the root of the problem. I would also be leery of using Gentamycin on a regular or semi-regular basis due to it's side effects. My older ( deceased )brother lost his hearing from it. And irrigating is yet another break in what should be a closed system. But we all find our own ways that work for our situations.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by crypticgimp View Post
                              if he is a diabetic, then yes there is a downside as mannose is a sugar.
                              d-mannose has no effect on the blood sugar. It is a different sort of "sugar" and almost none of it is taken up by the body. It goes from the gut to the urine. Check with your doctor, but from what I can find it is safe for diabetics.

                              d-mannose is only effective against certain types of e-coli. These particular e-coli apparently cause most bladder infections. Also it does not rip up the rest of your digestive system like major does of antibiotics do.

                              The last I heard, any given antibiotic is only effective against particular types of bacteria.

                              There is no downside in trying it, and huge potential upside. I have not been treated with antibiotics for a UTI in over a decade. This is because of d-mannose has been 100% effective for me over this time.
                              T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

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