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  • Originally posted by TheRainman View Post
    The only thing I can think of why your having so much problem with odor is your disbursing liquid type crap. Because I have zero odor. I do fart. But I have never seen or heard anyone of my coworkers or clients say anything negative about it. The big differents is when they fart we all smell it. When we fart there is no odor from us.
    Originally posted by TheRainman View Post

    As far as your coworkers. You need to contact your human resource dept.. They aren't acting properly.

    And I would definitly contact a ostomy nurse. Because you should not be having this type of problem with odors. If you have a solid seal how could you have an odor?
    Thanks for your thoughts... Before I respond here are a couple of things to keep in mind.

    I've had a colostomy for about 7,000 days {that's a lot of data points - spanning university, my early 20s to early 40s, extensive travel, climb up the corporate ladder in several different companies, several different parts of the country, ... - in other words I've received broad feedback IMO and not just mastered one environment with one set of people}. I also developed chronic eczema (where the outer adhesive ring is) on approximately day 1,500 which oozes and creates a faint odor of its own and have lived with it ever since.

    My response...
    I'm not sure I would say I have an odor problem. I have a faint odor sometimes when I have drained a bag (on say day 2) and where you can't get the sleeve back to its pristine condition. It's barely noticeable to me but all you need is to run into one of those bloodhound type folks that yells out "hey what is that smell?" and won't let it go until they track down the source (YOU!).

    I work in a fairly high end math/finance type environment (we tee up decision frameworks for the C suite folks) and HR doesn’t really apply (oh you could pull HR in and make a fuss but you’d be looking for a job shortly thereafter).

    Ostomy nurses are helpful initially but you ultimately have to live with the colostomy and figure out your own approach. Ostomy nurses can also be helpful later if you need to get a different perspective but other than that I think you’ll find their knowledge is quite thin compared to your experience as a long term colostomate.

    Disclaimer: I’m not saying all this for the sake of arguing. I actually think sharing my experiences and thought processes might assist others in determining whether this is something for them or not.
    Last edited by Patton57; 02-24-2013, 10:06 AM.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Patton57 View Post

      Thanks for your thoughts... Before I respond here are a couple of things to keep in mind.

      I've had a colostomy for about 7,000 days {that's a lot of data points - spanning university, my early 20s to early 40s, extensive travel, climb up the corporate ladder in several different companies, several different parts of the country, ... - in other words I've received broad feedback IMO and not just mastered one environment with one set of people}. I also developed chronic eczema (where the outer adhesive ring is) on approximately day 1,500 which oozes and creates a faint odor of its own and have lived with it ever since.

      My response...
      I'm not sure I would say I have an odor problem. I have a faint odor sometimes when I have drained a bag (on say day 2) and where you can't get the sleeve back to its pristine condition. It's barely noticeable to me but all you need is to run into one of those bloodhound type folks that yells out "hey what is that smell?" and won't let it go until they track down the source (YOU!).

      I work in a fairly high end math/finance type environment (we tee up decision frameworks for the C suite folks) and HR doesn’t really apply (oh you could pull HR in and make a fuss but you’d be looking for a job shortly thereafter).

      Ostomy nurses are helpful initially but you ultimately have to live with the colostomy and figure out your own approach. Ostomy nurses can also be helpful later if you need to get a different perspective but other than that I think you’ll find their knowledge is quite thin compared to your experience as a long term colostomate.

      Disclaimer: I’m not saying all this for the sake of arguing. I actually think sharing my experiences and thought processes might assist others in determining whether this is something for them or not.
      I think with a colostomy you need to change the bag dailey and clean the stoma with hand wipes. Otherwise I could see someone having odor issues. Plus it would be better on the skin. I know i'm new at this but with my program I have had no issues with odor or skin.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by TheRainman View Post
        I think with a colostomy you need to change the bag dailey and clean the stoma with hand wipes. Otherwise I could see someone having odor issues. Plus it would be better on the skin. I know i'm new at this but with my program I have had no issues with odor or skin.
        I'm glad yours is working well for you. It sure beats a bp IMO. I've never regreted getting mine.

        I don't mean to throw the colostomy experience card in your face either. I'm just saying that I've had a lot of different looks at it over the years. A lot of lessons learned if you will.

        You know, you really have your $hit together with this colostomy thing. Now if we can just get you cleaned up in the political forum we'll have you firing on all cylinders.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
          I'm glad yours is working well for you. It sure beats a bp IMO. I've never regreted getting mine.

          I don't mean to throw the colostomy experience card in your face either. I'm just saying that I've had a lot of different looks at it over the years. A lot of lessons learned if you will.

          You know, you really have your $hit together with this colostomy thing. Now if we can just get you cleaned up in the political forum we'll have you firing on all cylinders.

          My main concerned with this post was to let people know if you get a coostomy it can be easily taken care of without odors. A foley to me is a lot more difficult to take care of with all the sediments and infection issues. With a colostomy it changes your whole dailey schedule on your bm's. No more sitting on a commode for over an hour. Don't have to worry about accidents. You have a lot more free time and less worries.

          As far as my politics. Once the media starts holding obama upto his acountabilities. I think we will see a different president.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            Bad odor is not just a part of having a SCI, or a colostomy. It is more a reflection of your diet, or medication side effects. Your ostomy nurse can help you explore dietary measures to take, or medications, or bag deodorizers that can help with this.
            Shit smells like shit, no matter how you look at it.

            Originally posted by DeadEye View Post
            I agree that farts are the biggest problem for me too, and is difficult to deal with in a quiet setting like you describe. We can't feel the gas coming like a normal fart so there's no way to prepare. As Scott has said, irrigation will most likely remove most of this problem but it's just not feasible for me to irrigate.
            I hear ya on farts. I've actually gotten pretty relaxed on irrigation, and broken away from doing it on a schedule. I'll do it every 2 or 3 days just to get a good cleanse. Sometimes it's an AM thing, sometimes a PM thing. This probably isn't "ideal," but it allows for flexibility.

            Comment


            • I respectfully disagree with SCInurse. Vented bags do have an odor. They are no more or less effective than putting a pinhole in covering it with scotch tape… From my own personal experience with my husbands bag. The only time they ever smell is when we're changing it or if the seal on his bag has broken. If the seal is broken… It is not an overwhelming smell and one that I can't smell unless I stick my nose within an inch of the bag… Close to it to see if it is his imagination or if it is real. He is c5/6 and after 10 months Was back to transferring himself into bed and he does sleep on both sides. He tried to transfer back into bed earlier than that but transferred into bed on the same side where the back was… You can guess what happened. The next time he tried he transferred into bed on his other side. No problem since. That was four years ago. The bag is audible sometimes :-) but we just laugh… It's not ever too loud. But if we are in public he usually has reset on the side closest to the bag and if possible we said at the end of the table. But even if it were to make a noise people just assume he farted like anybody else. But the good news is there's nothing to smell :-). And it settle. He changes his bag every third day. He doesn't have finger dexterity but he does place the bag on himself. And during the day he is capable of emptyingit himself. He uses a Hollister lock and roll bag. Personal message me if you would like more details. He Wishes he had that much much sooner as he is been paralyzed since 92. The whole bowel program before involved suppositories, commade chairs and took hours… Led to autonomic dysreflexia… A lot of frustration and a lot of failed attempts. I am happy to give you more details if you would like. Gentrier@yahoo.com

              Comment


              • Colostomy and Emptying Urinary Leg Bag

                I bend all the way down (chest on knees) to empty my urinary leg bag (several times a day). Would that cause a colostomy bag to burst if there was something in it? Or would the pressure make it try to fill, and cause a blowout because it can't fill? Bending forward is the main way I empty my bowels now (on the commode chair), so the afternoon already can be tricky, when I'm emptying the leg bag a couple hours before my evening bowel program.
                "Cherish your tears. If you can cry, you still have some humanity left, and you are reclaiming more of it." -- David Kelly


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                • Unless you are putting direct pressure on the bag with some degree of consistency in the lbs per sq inch, you should be ok. You could try placing a bag in the general area and doing your normal leg bag emptying routine to see what happens.
                  CKF
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  • I had sigmoid colostomy surgery 16 days ago, and I'd like to weigh in firsthand on a couple questions. For me, there is no odor, except when changing or emptying the bag. I use M9 or Adapt drops in the bag and take one Devrom tablet per day.

                    I had 2 days when I smelled a strong odor (I have a very sensitive nose), but no one else smelled it (including StevieP). I think the bag was not snapped on all the way (I should have checked better), because I found it had popped open one morning when I woke up in bed. Fortunately, the only mess was a stain on the wafer edge, but not a leak under the wafer. We changed the wafer anyway, just to be sure, and it had not leaked.

                    So my odor fears are gone. Now, it's only a fear of fart sounds in quiet public places, like elevators (I live on the 18th floor). I know I can't avoid farts, and I'll probably try to ignore them. They usually occur while I'm eating/drinking or soon afterward. For now, I'm just trying to not eat right before I go out, but that will surely change. I've always eaten lunch at my desk at work, and I go back to work in a few weeks. That should be fun! One person suggested putting a pillow on my lap. I guess I'll try that if I'm feeling desperate, or I'll go out to lunch (since the colostomy gives me more free time!).

                    To avoid a peristomal hernia:
                    I currently hang my urinary leg bag on the side of my wc, covered up by a handkerchief. The pants have a zipper halfway down the thigh, so the catheter tube can come through. This works great to empty my leg bag into a toilet (if I don't let it get too full) without bending all the way forward (my old way), but I don't really like it in public. I also put a towel on my leg to hide the tubing. I have a JB-3 leg bag emptier on my wc, but I'm afraid to hook it up because my leg spasms could pull the tube off (and I don't want to strap or velcro my foot down). So the jury is still out on leg bag emptying.

                    As a C5/6 complete quad, I still can't quite empty or change the colostomy bag on my own. Since the stool has gotten thick, we are changing it every time (twice a day) because it's easier/cleaner than emptying thick stool. I have a nurse every morning, so it's only the evening when I want/need to be independent (besides emergencies). Last night, I successfully snapped on a new bag for the first time. I put thin cardboard (with a semi-circle cutout) under the edge of the wafer to create a harder surface to press against (or pull against, when removing the bag). Necessity is indeed the mother of invention.
                    "Cherish your tears. If you can cry, you still have some humanity left, and you are reclaiming more of it." -- David Kelly


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