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  • Fastest way to warm up my body?

    I get cold and it takes my body absolutely forever to warm back up (hours) even with tons of blankets etc.. What's the fastest way to warm up my body? Are there any particular trigger points (feet, neck etc.) that if I focus on them I'll warm up faster?
    P.S. I don't want to use electric blankets and similar stuff for fear of burning myself.

  • #2
    The fastest and safest way to warm up imo is to cover all the furthest points from your heart. Use some wool thermal socks (then cover with trash bag if needed) and all that omni-heat stuff from columbia sports wear is awesome. trust I.

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    • #3
      The most important part is your head.
      Wear a light nightcap. A simple one is just a T-shirt - put the neck end over your head, down to your eyebrows, covering the back of your neck.
      My wife thought this was silly at first, but she became a convert and always had her head covered at night.
      When you're outside (or cold inside), wear a stocking cap.
      - Richard

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      • #4
        I admit it, I am spoiled. NL throws my blankets and night shirt into the dryer before I get into bed, changes me into a warm night shirt and layers on the warm blankets once I am in bed. It is heaven!!! On bowel program nights, she puts those light weight, tightly woven "hospital" blankets into the dryer and when I get up in the commode chair, she drapes one over my head and shoulders, and one over my lap and knees.

        She got this idea from endoscopy units and outpatient surgery centers that have blanket warmers and offer you warmed blankets as they prepare you for procedures and surgeries.

        I wear wool socks in bed. The shoes I wear daily are a pair (dare I say it) Uggs shearling lined slippers that look like suede and leather loafers. When I lost all of my hair due to chemotherapy, I slept with ski caps pulled over my head and ears and also wore them during the day. On cold days, I use a wool lap blanket. Keeping your feet, head and hands warm really help warm the rest of the body.

        All the best,
        GJ

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        • #5
          As a quad I give first attention to my head and upper body where I have temperature sensation. Maybe it all in our head. lol Read the excerpt below that I posted in an earlier thread:

          You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
          http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

          See my personal webpage @
          http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            I am a para and cold all the time. While watching TV or reading I sit with my back to small ceramic heater blowing on my upper back and nape of my neck. Also, since I have sensation above the waist I go to sleep with a heating pad on my chest. The pad I use shuts off after 2 hours. The presence of the heat on my chest acts like a sleeping pill, even if I try to read in bed I nod off after about 2o minutes.

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            • #7
              I think I have finally solved the problem of very cold feet - I'm wearing Sierra Designs down booties for the rest of the winter!! They are black and about 8" tall of puffy warmth. Wear thermal socks under them.

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              • #8
                I would never have pushed to retire in Wisconsin without a ceiling track lift and a soaking tub. I can maintain the temperature of the water once set as the tub has a 220 volt add on heater. For any winter outdoor fun stuff like ice festivals and such I knew no matter how warm I dressed my legs especially would be freezing afterwards. The four jets help with circulation.
                I am also a big fan of the neck or shoulder warmers filled with rice or flax and microwaved for 2 minutes. Any reheats are 1 minute. I have wrapped them around my ankles while watching TV before heading to bed because my feet really get cold. In bed it's back around my neck. Once heated it gets a good shake to distribute the heat evenly and that is as hot as it will get. No burn risks.
                Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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                • #9
                  I'm with sue on the neck warmers. If you want to give it a try for cheap, fill and old cotton knee sock with rice, tie the top. Microwave it for 1-2 minutes (start low, with a home made one, as it may be small and fast.

                  The actual shaped ones work better, but that is a quickie.

                  Hats help too.

                  Good point of the feet too people .... I tend to ignore mine, cuz I can't "feel them" and then I get really chilled. I have started wearing furry lined boots (can't bring myself to name them, lol).
                  T7-8 since Feb 2005

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                  • #10
                    A down sleeping bag. Either get into it or drape it over you. I also wear a jacket in the house sometimes.

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                    • #11
                      Echo the hearing pad but rolled up and under my neck ... a timer is important as I did burn myself on one before.
                      Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                      T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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                      • #12
                        thanks all... I do many of these as well. I put my blankets in the dryer to get them warm, throw towels in the microwave for 10-20 seconds and place them on my head & chest... even doing things like this, I'll actually get colder sometimes.
                        I'll be cold, take my temperature and get something like 97.4... after 2 hours of trying to warm myself up I'll take it again... sometimes it won't have budged and often it will actually drop more before finally starting to come back up

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                        • #13
                          Be very careful with heating pads or those microwaved feed corn/rice sacks. I have seen bad burns from both, esp. if applied to areas where you do not have sensation, and I have a news article about a woman who started a house fire with one of the feed bags.

                          Hot water bottles and electric blankets are equally problematic.

                          We got my mother a towel warmer a number of years ago. Her PCA would put a blanket in it before she got ready for bed, and then put this blanket under the down comforter over the sheets. It was very nice. Of course you can also use it to warm towels for when you get out of the shower:

                          http://www.amazon.com/Interactive-Gr...3430658&sr=1-5

                          In bed, flannel sheets and a down comforter are helpful (use a duvet as the top sheet...ideally flannel as well). A stocking cap and wearing long underwear also help, as can down booties.

                          Consider fingerless gloves and leg warmers when out of bed, and wear long underwear as well. Preventing getting chilled in the first place will help a lot for people with body temperature control issues, like many with SCI.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                          • #14
                            Snuggies for when you're up... and then microfleece sheets in bed. Couldn't live without my fuzzy sheets in winter; they're just like a polar fleece sweatshirt. Giant socks too, in bed and out.

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                            • #15
                              wchair, given the additional information I think you need to be warmed from the inside out. I keep some spiced cider around during the cold weather. I take about 3/4 of a mug of the cider and heat it in the microwave until it is hot and fill the rest of the mug with rum. After a few sips, it only takes 5-10 minutes until I feel the warmth from the alcohol doing its fast burnoff. And so good!
                              You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                              http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                              See my personal webpage @
                              http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                              Comment

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