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Glad to be injured in the first world

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    Glad to be injured in the first world

    All ways wondered what it would be like to have a SCI in a third world country
    http://blogs.aljazeera.com/blog/afri...g-change-kenya
    And check out that chair.
    T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

    #2
    I all so wonder about there cath. supply's, and how many utis they must get. And I bet that it's pretty hard to find a Roho or similar cushion.
    T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

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      #3
      Originally posted by flying View Post
      I all so wonder about there cath. supply's, and how many utis they must get. And I bet that it's pretty hard to find a Roho or similar cushion.
      I imagine they use the clean technique and reuse their caths if they have access to water.

      They might just use old pillows for cushions.

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        #4
        Or, they get a bad infection and die. I doubt the life of an SCI is very long post inury.

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          #5
          Sometimes it's good to be thankful that we live in a fairly advanced country as we go through life with a spinal cord injury. I really feel for people who have an injury and live in undeveloped, poor countries...must be a very tough life.
          C4/5 incomplete, 17 years since injury

          "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” - Carlos Castaneda

          "We live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom: our body." - Marcel Proust

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            #6
            The chair is likely one made in an area shop operated by mostly disabled people. There are a couple of groups that travel to third world countries and teach them to make chairs of local, inexpensive parts, and are suitable for the local environment. They use a lot of bicycle components and scavenged materials.
            You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
            http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

            See my personal webpage @
            http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by KyleP2112 View Post
              Sometimes it's good to be thankful that we live in a fairly advanced country as we go through life with a spinal cord injury. I really feel for people who have an injury and live in undeveloped, poor countries...must be a very tough life.
              My thoughts exactly Kyle! Couldn't have said it better
              T11 Asia A after near-fatal bike crash.. Just happy to still be here

              No, I didn't loose my mind... It got scared and ran away!!

              Comment


                #8
                Even the differences in a "2nd World" country like Brazil were a shock to me when I was there in 2002.
                • Crapy wheelchairs which were metal versions of the wicker chair that FDR use. Cushion built into the chair, so impossible to replace, customize, nor did it really reduce pressures significantly.
                • Little or no access to modern wound care products or methods for the frequent pressure ulcers acquired in the ICU and immediate post-injury peroid.
                • Limited or no access to formal SCI rehabilitation programs. None that were CARF accredited. Few SCI-experienced staff in trauma centers.
                • Roughly $50/month income for their equivilent of SSDI.
                • People with SCI desparate for information and resources on everything from bowel care to sexuality.
                • Limited wheelchair accessiblity, or rights for people with disabilities.
                It sure made it hard for me coming back to work in the USA to not grab some of my clients by the shoulders and say "be thankful for what you have here", esp. for my Veteran population!

                (I am moving this to the Life forum, though).

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  #9
                  The orthotist who made my AFO and KAFO recently traveled to India. He said that he saw many, many children and adults with polio, MS and other conditions wearing heavy metal braces of the kind developed in the 1950s and before. I am extremely grateful for what is available where I live - though access is often a huge problem.
                  MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                    #10
                    Well I am in a 3rd world country right now nicaragua to be exact. It fucken sucks. I only came so my son could meet his great grandmothers before they pass away. I am spending my birthday here never again...

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                      #11
                      I know just what you mean. A few years back, I had the privilege of working for the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation (VVAF). At the time, VVAF operated clinics that provided wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, and braces to people with disabilities in 11 third world countries, most of which had populations who became disabled because of landmines. (VVAF was the co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for founding the International Campaign to Ban Landmines.)

                      Seeing every single day what a comfortable, charmed life I live and all the opportunities I have because I happened to be born to my parents was a truly humbling experience that stayed with me.
                      It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.

                      ~Julius Caesar

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