Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Female cathing?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Female cathing?

    First of all - I'm finally back to CC!!!!! I've been intermittent cathing ever since I became a t-9/t-10 para nearly 17 years ago. I've always have had a problem with UTIs no matter what I do to prevent them.

    I haven't been to a urologist in who knows when. I would like to see what some of my options for cathing could be before finding a urologist to go to. Any suggestions?

    #2
    nscia is having a webinar next week about this very issue! if you want i can send the link.

    i am getting my dr to switch me to a closed bag system. i got a 30 day sample from hollister and i LOVE it so will gather info and have my dr let me have this system.
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
    http://www.elportavoz.com/

    Comment


      #3
      I recently had the chance to talk with an infectious disease specialist. I don't get a lot of infections (at the very most 2 per year), but I do have an augmented bladder so there is mucus in my bladder & urine.

      Anyhow, after we talked for a bit we were thinking that public restrooms might be the biggest risk factor for me. As a student, I have to use them frequently, and they are rarely clean. She recommended:

      - Wash hands before going into stall
      - wipe down toilet seat, flush handle, etc with antibacterial wipe
      - transfer, pull down pants, get stuff ready
      - use hand sanitizer
      - cath (bring along paper lunch bag to use for garbage, instead of touching the feminine product disposal box or other garbage receptacle)

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by jgrant27 View Post
        I recently had the chance to talk with an infectious disease specialist. I don't get a lot of infections (at the very most 2 per year), but I do have an augmented bladder so there is mucus in my bladder & urine.

        Anyhow, after we talked for a bit we were thinking that public restrooms might be the biggest risk factor for me. As a student, I have to use them frequently, and they are rarely clean. She recommended:

        - Wash hands before going into stall
        - wipe down toilet seat, flush handle, etc with antibacterial wipe
        - transfer, pull down pants, get stuff ready
        - use hand sanitizer
        - cath (bring along paper lunch bag to use for garbage, instead of touching the feminine product disposal box or other garbage receptacle)
        so u got the augment but no stoma?
        "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
        http://www.elportavoz.com/

        Comment


          #5
          I have a stoma as well, but it's really slow to drain, and if I'm in a hurry to get somewhere I tend to just cath via urethra.

          Comment


            #6
            I have been injured 20 yrs and did IC for the first 10. The last 10 I have been using a leg bag and it has made my life sooo much easier! I haven't seen any difference in infection. From reading on here, I gather I am colonized as I have continuos cloudiness and smell in the urine, but rarely get to the point of fever etc. I think I have only had to take antibiotics for bladder/kidney infection once in the last 5 yrs. I do see a urologists one a year for blood work and xray of bladder, but don't think he is well informed on SCI and related bladder issues. I would like to see any new info related to bladder infection management.

            Comment


              #7
              yes, please post the link to the webinar next week. I had hoped that some of the other ladies would chime in on their routines to give me a clue of what to ask after I find a new urologist.

              Thanks for the info rebajane!

              Comment


                #8
                NSCIA Webinar Series
                a program of United Spinal Association

                Please join us for this webinar.

                Accessing the Catheter that Best Works for You!
                Thu, Jun 7, 2012
                3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

                Register for this webinar

                Program Overview
                People living with an SCI/D, caregivers and health care professionals are invited to join us for this webinar to discuss the availability of today’s intermittent catheters under Medicare and learn about the full range of catheter types, both open and closed systems, taking into account medical need and safety.

                Speakers
                Presenter: Deanna Eaves, Senior Manager/Reimbursement, Hollister
                Sponsored by Hollister
                "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
                http://www.elportavoz.com/

                Comment


                  #9
                  Mithronoff w/o augment?
                  Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                  I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Clean with betadine or what before cathing? In public area I would recommend the Iodine pads- urethra and stoma.
                    CWO
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X