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    Colonoscopy

    The Doctor at my annual SCI checkup said I need a colonoscopy, a look at the inside of my intestines.

    I am sure that I do not want to do the prep at home as I only have attendants in the morning and evening for 4 hour shifts. Also I am conserned about a regular hospital being a C5/6 Quad because most have no clue about bowel programs or neurogenic bowel's in particular. I have enlarged intestines acording to the Doc so I have a few days stored up and am sure of a real mess.

    What is the normal procedure to do a colonoscopy on a high quad?
    Thanks
    C 5/6 Comp.
    No Tri's or hand function.

    Far better it is to try mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure. Than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much or suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows neither victory or defeat.

    Teddy Roosevelt

    #2
    I am C6/7 complete. My wife is my attendant. I have prepped for 4 colonoscopies at home. It isn't a picnic. If you don't have a dedicated full time caregiver, I would definitely suggest doing the preparation in the hospital, if that option is available to you. But, there are thing you can do in advance to help in the process.

    My routine is to start a low residue, low fiber diet about a week before the preparation for the colonoscopy. Continue your regular bowel programs during this time. You can read about suggested foods for this diet: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/low-fiber-diet/my00744

    About 3 days before the preparation, I go on a liquid diet, clear broth, clear juice, jello (No red or orange colored flavors), popcicles (no red or orange flavors), 7-up, ginger-ale, sprite, water, tea, coffee with no sugar/cream/milk.

    There are several options for the actual preparation and what you take will depend on the doctor's orders or the routine that the hospital follows. I have used a preparation, Colyte, that is a powder mixed with a gallon of water. One 8 ounce glass is taken every 30 minutes, until most of the stuff is gone and watery stool begins to pass. Other preparations include some combination Ducolax suppositories, Gatorade and Miralax or Fleet phosoda; citro-magnesium etc.

    Your particular hospital may use Colon Hydrotherapy for preparation.

    Take your own commode chair with you. Make sure you don't spend too much time on the commode without some pressure relief time.

    Good luck,

    All the best,
    GJ

    Comment


      #3
      colonoscopy prep

      Dear forestranger52
      gjnl gave excellent advice. I hope all goes well for you with the colonoscopy.
      pbr
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #4
        Unfortunately no comode chair use and will need to do everything on my side in bed, that is what mostly concerns me. I would not want to spend 3 days in a hospital, switching from side to side, repeating the bowel program over and over again until everything comes out clear. My rectum could not manage that. I would hope that an enema repeaded every so often would work also but I haven't had much luck with the fleet enemas and would probably require an industrial version. I tried the Peristeen but the bubble burst and the water came out before it did any good.

        Appreciate the help.
        Last edited by forestranger52; 12 Apr 2012, 6:54 PM.
        C 5/6 Comp.
        No Tri's or hand function.

        Far better it is to try mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure. Than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much or suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows neither victory or defeat.

        Teddy Roosevelt

        Comment


          #5
          Check with your doctor about colon hydrotherapy. I'm not sure how widely it's used. I have had one colonoscopy and against medical advice, I'm not having another. My wife is my primary caregiver and I'll not subject her to that again.

          Hope you find a better solution.
          Tom

          "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

          Comment


            #6
            I usually do my BP on my side, but for colonoscopy prep a commode is a necessity. As is extra help. Mine was a nightmare despite having fasted for five days.

            Comment


              #7
              My brother had his colonoscopy last year and it was much easier than anticipated by me, his caregiver. We did go to the hospital the evvening before since I figured there would be plenty of linen, disposal and help. He started drinking the go-lytely at about 4-5pm and I put him in bed about 7pm-no accident, yea! I had triple padded the bed, using turn sheets, cloth incontinence pads in 3 separate layers. Keeping him on his side, I would dig stim after putting a few chux just at the back (not really laying under him much) and receive the stool or watery mess, then wash the area and if some got off the chux the we could just roll him onto the next layer of turn sheet/cloth pads. I would do this every couple of hours thru the night, adding more padding as needed. So he was never laying on chux unless being stim'd. It would take about 5-10 minutes to do the deed every 2 hours. The hospital staff only helped once, but I was still glad we were there for laundry services. When we checked in I immediately went to the linen room and got a huge stack of linen supplies and brought a soiled laundry cart into the room for conveniance. He had had full liquids for the day prior to admission but since he is type l diabetic that was about all that was a change in diet, except cl liquids the night at hospital. We were rewarded with the doc saying it was the clearest colon he had seen in some time and had a good report. We went home about 3 hours after the procedure and never did have an accident. The usual BP (every 2-3 days) was a little lighter than usual for a few days after. He uses no laxatives or suppositories/enemas for his bowel program, just dig stim and manual assist in bed.
              Maybe you could ask your doc or the hospitalist doc where you are going to order an assistant at the hospital be assigned to you or private hire for the night. That way you would be cleaned consistently and there is less cross contamination while at the hospital with just one assistant. HJim would have layed in it for long periods if I hadn't been there, they had no idea what to do. That's another thing you could do-talk to the charge nurse before admission so they can be ready. Could you personal attendents take you for the first 4 hours and then come in early in am to help you? Hope this is helpful, I was sooooo dreading this, but it was much easier than I thought it would be. Best of luck, Deb

              Comment


                #8
                Lilstster: You are one of God's precious gems!!!!
                C5/C6

                Comment


                  #9
                  What about a rectal tube?

                  A few years ago I had a nasty bout of pneumonia that had me hospitalized for 2 weeks in an induced coma, on vent assist, heavy duty antibiotics, and a rectal tube to deal with the loose bowels. I had a barely stage 2 on my right ischial going in.

                  I was discharged with only a slight increase in depth in my stage 2. I considered the rectal tube a miracle. As was the bed that did everything but dance with me - auto-turn and alternating air pressure relief, temperature control, vibration to shake crap loose in my lungs, tracked my weight. Without the tube, though.... /shudder
                  -------------------------
                  Gunnery Sergeant Hartman: "...your ass looks like about a hundred and fifty pounds of chewed bubblegum!"

                  Comment


                    #10
                    lilsister

                    you are an angel

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I have the doctor check me into the hospital for any bowel prep pre-procedure [colonoscopy, kidneystone lithotripsy] but never for more than a 23 hr stay [ something about insurance coverage and same day surgery criteria]. I start with the commode and eventually wind up in the hospital bed. It is always an exhausting experience and a nightmare and the nursing staff are tired by the end too. My bowels work at glacial speeds resulting in my stiil undergoing bowel cleansing procedures right up to an hour before being wheeled down on a gurney for the procedure. If you know of any foods which you have eaten or drank that can trigger the runs [ex- very fatty/greasy foods; grapefruit juice. castor oil] than start consuming them 48 hrs beforehand.

                      Peggy c5-c6

                      PS- my elecolytes are always knocked out of the acceptable ranges after these hideous bowel preps. You might want to have your electrolytes monitored before you are discharged.
                      Last edited by peegy p; 14 Apr 2012, 12:36 PM. Reason: added information

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by lilsister View Post
                        My brother had his colonoscopy last year and it was much easier than anticipated by me, his caregiver. We did go to the hospital the evvening before since I figured there would be plenty of linen, disposal and help. He started drinking the go-lytely at about 4-5pm and I put him in bed about 7pm-no accident, yea! I had triple padded the bed, using turn sheets, cloth incontinence pads in 3 separate layers. Keeping him on his side, I would dig stim after putting a few chux just at the back (not really laying under him much) and receive the stool or watery mess, then wash the area and if some got off the chux the we could just roll him onto the next layer of turn sheet/cloth pads. I would do this every couple of hours thru the night, adding more padding as needed. So he was never laying on chux unless being stim'd. It would take about 5-10 minutes to do the deed every 2 hours. The hospital staff only helped once, but I was still glad we were there for laundry services. When we checked in I immediately went to the linen room and got a huge stack of linen supplies and brought a soiled laundry cart into the room for conveniance. He had had full liquids for the day prior to admission but since he is type l diabetic that was about all that was a change in diet, except cl liquids the night at hospital. We were rewarded with the doc saying it was the clearest colon he had seen in some time and had a good report. We went home about 3 hours after the procedure and never did have an accident. The usual BP (every 2-3 days) was a little lighter than usual for a few days after. He uses no laxatives or suppositories/enemas for his bowel program, just dig stim and manual assist in bed.
                        Maybe you could ask your doc or the hospitalist doc where you are going to order an assistant at the hospital be assigned to you or private hire for the night. That way you would be cleaned consistently and there is less cross contamination while at the hospital with just one assistant. HJim would have layed in it for long periods if I hadn't been there, they had no idea what to do. That's another thing you could do-talk to the charge nurse before admission so they can be ready. Could you personal attendents take you for the first 4 hours and then come in early in am to help you? Hope this is helpful, I was sooooo dreading this, but it was much easier than I thought it would be. Best of luck, Deb
                        Deb,
                        No pun intended, but you really had this situation "covered." Great work. I'm sure you brother is grateful for your caring and expertise.

                        All the best,
                        GJ

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Thank you very much lilsister. I was feared that it was quite a procedure and you explained it very well. Looks like a few days in the hospital at the regional SCI clinic, they or me may not like it but I am sure they can handel it. Just need to carefully watch for pressure spots.
                          C 5/6 Comp.
                          No Tri's or hand function.

                          Far better it is to try mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure. Than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much or suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows neither victory or defeat.

                          Teddy Roosevelt

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by forestranger52 View Post
                            Thank you very much lilsister. I was feared that it was quite a procedure and you explained it very well. Looks like a few days in the hospital at the regional SCI clinic, they or me may not like it but I am sure they can handel it. Just need to carefully watch for pressure spots.
                            Up here in the land socialized medicine, a one-day stay for colon prep is out of the question, let alone a few days. I asked. Do you have insurance that guarantees the overnight stay?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
                              Up here in the land socialized medicine, a one-day stay for colon prep is out of the question, let alone a few days. I asked. Do you have insurance that guarantees the overnight stay?
                              As "peegy p" mentioned, I've heard of the 23 hour stay in the hospital for this type of procedure, but certainly not a few days. When I read "Looks like a few days in the hospital at the regional SCI clinic..." by "forestranger52, " I was surprised too, maybe there are more medical check ups planned than just the colonoscopy. I would guess that private pay insurance and medicare would require preauthorization.

                              All the best,
                              GJ

                              Comment

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