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    Diabetes

    Just got the news yesterday that I've got diabetes to add to my c5-6 SCI. Does anybody else in here have diabetes and, if so, how has it impacted your SCI or vice-versa? Thx.
    Rick Goldstein
    GO! Mobility Solutions
    facebook.com/goes.anywhere

    #2
    I've got it, and lupus too. Had a three way bypass in may, got a bi-pap machine, had a fusion of the c-2/3 , had a stroke 2 yrs ago, and I go fishin as often as possible, and hunting whenever I can. Don't let it slow ya down, or your a goner. Good luck, eat smaller portions and watch the sugar intake, use splenda, or somthin like it. .

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      #3
      My brother,c5 also, had type l or insulin dependent diabetes for 30 years before having his accident. But he was in good shape, actually training for a triathalon before too. I was very worried how the SCI would impact the diabetes but it's all good. He has had almost no issue due to the diabetes, no skin breakdown at all, good healing times. We do note that any UTI symptoms affect his blood sugar readings and I wonder if tx for such isn't quicker due to the diabetes. His A1c is a little higher than it used to be because it's harder to get activity levels up enough. Good diet and skin care has helped alot. Need to get eyes checked yearly, maintain a moderate diet (watch carbs) and keep an eye on any cardiac sx. I'm sure you'll do fine. Deb any specific questions?

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        #4
        Originally posted by goldnucs View Post
        Just got the news yesterday that I've got diabetes to add to my c5-6 SCI. Does anybody else in here have diabetes and, if so, how has it impacted your SCI or vice-versa? Thx.

        Hi Rick,

        From one C5-C6 to another, it appears I am following you. My doctor has me testing my blood sugar and the last three nights it has been 557,420 & 512. I have all the symptoms except hunger as I don't want to eat anything...just drinking water, milk and gatorade. In the last 7 weeks, I have lost between 30 to 40 lbs. I guess I'll find out next week when I visit my PCP.

        Good luck with yours and I'll let you know how mine goes.
        Millard
        ''Life's tough... it's even tougher if you're stupid!'' -- John Wayne

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          #5
          Diabetic here too. Just watch your carbs, eat healthy, and make sure you have good evaluations done yearly on your eyes (testing for retinopathy). Every 3-6 months your doc should run a A1C test, which is a mean of your glucose levels over approx. three months. I was diagnosed in 2003 and so far no problems.

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            #6
            Might check out http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

            Also, there is a book http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/20585442.php with the same information.
            T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

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              #7
              HgbA1C is the test to find out what has been going on for several months. And less complications when discovered and treated- start with diet but if that isn't keeping it down, then medications, exercise. In most it is easily controllable.
              CWO
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                #8
                I also am Type 1 diabetic and was for 32 years before my injury. My blood sugar control is much better now than before due to a more settled routine with a similar amout of exercise and physical work each day. My diet is similar but with less calories due to the reduced activity level. Keeping your weight under control is key. My blood sugar levels also go up with UTI or any other type infection and I use it to diagnose infections. Good luck!

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                  #9
                  I was type 1 diabetic for 20 years prior to my SCI. I've wondered how much the diabetes has played into SCI recovery since diabetics heal slower, over all.

                  One other poster mentioned UTIs and I want to stress that with you. Diabetics get UTIs easier because of high sugar episodes. As you probably know UTIs are inherently part of an SCI life. If you have diabetes, this may become more challenging.

                  It's scary to get such a diagnosis. However, I can tell you that once you get used to the routine, it's pretty much life as usual. I don't even think of it as being a bother.

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                    #10
                    Walmart has a mail in HbA1c test available for about $10. The lab is certified Level I (the best possible rating) by the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program http://www.ngsp.org/ The test is almost certainly more accurate and cheaper than your local lab. Walmart also seems to have good meters and test strips at the best prices. I am guessing that one on the Waltons must have diabetes.
                    T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

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                      #11
                      Thanks everyone; never realized there were so many diabetic SCI's. In retrospect, I've probably had it for years as I began having symptoms long ago. My night vision went to hell 4 or 5 years ago followed by my overall vision. My optho told me that I had minor cataracts in both eyes but that they should not have been causing me such severe problems. I just had my second cataract removal and intraocular lens implant last Monday, then diagnosed with diabetes on Thursday. I hope that I'll be able t see after my vision "clears up" as my diabetes meds kick in.
                      Rick Goldstein
                      GO! Mobility Solutions
                      facebook.com/goes.anywhere

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The standard test of fasting blood sugar tells you have diabetes about a decade after it starts doing damage to your body.

                        The website http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/ is very helpful. She has diabetes and has created a community of people with diabetes, as opposed to drug company sales pitches.

                        Diet is incredibly important in type 2 diabetes. Cutting out all of the processed carbohydrates (bread, sugar, high fructose corn syrup), and limiting other high gycemic carbohydrates (potatoes) can have a dramatic effect on your blood sugar. Testing blood sugar 90 minutes after you start to eat is a very good way to determine if a diet change is good or bad.

                        The importance of regular A1c testing cannot be overstated. I am not a fan of Walmart in general, but in this case they are your friend.
                        T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

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                          #13
                          Patients with diabetes are advised not to consume sugar, sugary foods and drinks, white flour and high-fat foods. Each meal should contain vegetables or fruit.

                          A proper and healthy diet will have a positive impact on: blood sugar levels and reducing its rise after a meal, blood pressure (avoiding salt and salty foods will lower your blood pressure). For more information see blood pressure chart and information on blood pressure, cholesterol ? lower fat levels (cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood. You can additionally lower your cholesterol level by eat a diet that will lower your cholesterol levels, your BMI (BMI ? body mass index). Healthy diet will regulate your body weight. Obese and overweight people are at much higher risk of developing diabetes (type 2) compared to those with a healthy body weight.

                          If your blood sugar levels (blood glucose levels) are increased for a longer period of time and no action is taken to lower BS levels, you may suffer permanent damage.
                          This includes: eye damage: retinopathy ? eye defects which may lead to formation of cataracts and blindness. kidney damage: nephropathy ? renal failure over time. damage to nervous system: polyneuropathy ? tingling, pain, loss of sense of touch and leg pain. Also possible impotence and digestion problems. damage to cardiovascular system: accelerated atherosclerosis ? angina pectoris, heart and brain stroke, vascular occlusions. problems with feet: formation of wounds that do not heal and lead to amputation of toes, feet, or whole limb. immune system disorders: urinary tract infections, fungal infections, lowered immunity.

                          How to adjust your eating habits after you have been diagnosed?
                          If you have been diagnosed with diabetes you should adjust your diet as follows. Several times a day eat vegetables (either fresh, cooked, stewed) and fruit. If possible, always choose home grown fruits and vegetables over imported ones.
                          Enjoy low-fat foods and avoid the use of animal fat (saturated fat). Switch from using saturated fat to using unsaturated fat. Prepare food mainly by boiling or baking ? with minimal use of fat.

                          Choose low-fat meat and low-fat meat products. Before preparing meat try to remove all visible fat. Always enjoy skimmed milk and milk products with lower fat percentage. Overuse of salt in your diet may lead to high blood pressure. The more salt you consume the higher the blood pressure.

                          Never put additional salt on your food and avoid products that contain a lot of salt. Lower the consumption of alcohol to a minimum. A glass of (dry) wine with lunch or dinner is acceptable, heavy drinking is not. You can also drink one to two cups of coffee (no sugar and cream added) a day.

                          You can sweeten your coffee with artificial sweeteners and can add a little skimmed milk. Above guidelines are pretty strict and sometimes it is hard to follow them all. Occasional minor or slight deviation from the principles of a healthy diet (although not recommended) will not do permanent damage. Constantly breaking the rules of a diabetic diet though can seriously harm you and worsen your condition!

                          With a proper diet you will reduce and maintain appropriate body weight. Increased body weight (being moderately overweight or obese) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, increased blood pressure and increased blood sugar levels. In order to lose weight a reduced energy intake is required. This means you should eat less than you burn for per day. Read an article on how many calories should I eat to lose weight to find out more about proper weight loss.

                          How to adjust your eating habits after you have been diagnosed?

                          If you have been diagnosed with diabetes you should adjust your diet as follows. Several times a day eat vegetables (either fresh, cooked, stewed) and fruit. If possible, always choose home grown fruits and vegetables over imported ones. Enjoy low-fat foods and avoid the use of animal fat (saturated fat). Switch from using saturated fat to using unsaturated fat.

                          Prepare food mainly by boiling or baking ? with minimal use of fat. Choose low-fat meat and low-fat meat products. Before preparing meat try to remove all visible fat. Always enjoy skimmed milk and milk products with lower fat percentage. Overuse of salt in your diet may lead to high blood pressure. The more salt you consume the higher the blood pressure. Never put additional salt on your food and avoid products that contain a lot of salt. Lower the consumption of alcohol to a minimum. A glass of (dry) wine with lunch or dinner is acceptable, heavy drinking is not. You can also drink one to two cups of coffee (no sugar and cream added) a day. You can sweeten your coffee with artificial sweeteners and can add a little skimmed milk.

                          Above guidelines are pretty strict and sometimes it is hard to follow them all. Occasional minor or slight deviation from the principles of a healthy diet (although not recommended) will not do permanent damage. Constantly breaking the rules of a diabetic diet though can seriously harm you and worsen your condition! With a proper diet you will reduce and maintain appropriate body weight. Increased body weight (being moderately overweight or obese) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, increased blood pressure and increased blood sugar levels. In order to lose weight a reduced energy intake is required. This means you should eat less than you burn for per day.

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                            #14
                            Ups, I accidentally posted a bit of text 2 times. Sorry.

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