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  • Tobacco Use Cessation and SCI

    Smoking and the use of other tobacco products (snuff, chewing tobacco, etc.) is one of the most unhealthy habits possible for a person with SCI. Smokers with SCI have a higher rate of pressure ulcers, ED, osteoporosis, heart disease, and lung and breathing problems.

    Veterans continue to use tobacco products at a higher rate than the general population in the USA, and it has been estimated that as many as 30% of SCI Veterans do so.

    The PVA has funded the development of a new video on smoking cessation that details the adverse effects that smoking can have on your health if you have a spinal cord injury. You can view the video here:
    https://www.uab.edu/medicine/sci/uab-scims-information/smokings-effects-on-secondary-complications-of-sci-video

    A DVD copy of this video can also be purchased for $5 through the same link.

    Your provider and local health care facilities/organizations have many resources available to you to assist you in stopping smoking and tobacco use. It is not easy, but classes, support groups, medications, and counseling can be very helpful. Quitting can cause immediate results in improved health and quality of life for you.

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 11-07-2018, 11:20 AM.
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  • #2
    damn, seems like all my enjoyments are bad for me
    We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
    Ronald Reagan

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    • #3
      Originally posted by brucec View Post
      damn, seems like all my enjoyments are bad for me
      Well Bruce my thoughts are you only live once. Might as well enjoy stuff. Even if it's bad for you

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by orangejello View Post
        Well Bruce my thoughts are you only live once. Might as well enjoy stuff. Even if it's bad for you
        thats what I do, smoke, drink, whats the old saying sex, drugs and rock n roll!
        We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
        Ronald Reagan

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        • #5
          I want to quit. The VA in my towm has a great program, but I will have to miss the January start because of some upcoming surgeries I plan to have. Maybe next time.
          Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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          • #6
            you won't be smoking while in the hospital for surgeries... THAT is the time to quit...errr STAY quit.
            Cold Turkey is the best way. That way you CEASE intake of the addicting substance, rather than continuing ingesting it and PRETENDING to quit.

            If you stop eating and drink plenty of water and NATURAL fruit juices for nourishment, your body will be concentrating on FOOD and for the most part, nicotine will not come to mind.
            THROW AWAY all tobacco at your house and in your vehicles.Ask smoking friends to refrain from it around you.
            Do not drink alcohol or caffeine as both of these will initiate a nicotine craving.
            It will take about 3 days for the nicotine to be flushed from your body...drink, drink, drink.
            After this, it is almost over, the hard part, that is.
            Stay away from it for a few days and then it is up to you to remain stedfast and resist those urges. Simple, free and up to you.

            These are the MAJOR guidelines from a cancer surgeon who has spent a lifetime teaching folks how to quit.

            https://www.facebook.com/john.baxter.1213986

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            • #7
              Do you know if that cancer surgeon has ever smoked? I have stopped more than once and I have had withdrawls for at least 2 weeks
              TH 12, 43 years post

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              • #8
                I quit in 2001 after smoking for 28 years. Went cold turkey and definitely not easy. I’m a firm believer it’s easier to lose weight than quit smoking. Although I didn’t have a lot of problems when I did smoke, sure glad I did. I can’t even imagine how I would feel today if I still did. Aging isn’t easy for anyone but with an sci it presents additional challenges. If I were still puffing I can only imagine how I would be feeling by now.

                When people asked me how and why I quit this is what I said. My fear wasn’t so much dying from smoking for all those years, although I really would prefer to stick around for awhile longer, lol it was the prospect of surviving and living with an oxygen tank off the back of my chair: being the c/5-6 incomplete that I am. Worse yet, didn’t need to add the possibility of stroking out and having to deal with that on top of an sci. People always seem to think of death from obesity, smoking, diabetes and heart disease. I’m no vegan or an obsessive health nut but I try to be conscious and take care of myself because I would like to do whatever I can to not sustain another disability on top of what I already have. Aging into my 50’s with a sci has already started what I call becoming disabled twice.

                I urge anyone to quit. You may not be lucky and just die. You just may add more issues to the quality of life that you currently have and live for quite a long time with your second disability. I say this with great sincerity and by no means in an offensive way.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for posting that KLD. I hope it stops someone from smoking.
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Compiled by JSB, Lakes Region General Hospital, Laconia, NH

                    What happens after:
                    20 Minutes
                    Your blood pressure returns to its usual level.
                    Your pulse rate slows to normal.
                    Your circulation has improved enough that your hands and feet warm to normal temperature.
                    4 Hours
                    Half the carbon monoxide from your last cigarette has left your bloodstream.
                    8 Hours
                    The carbon monoxide from your last cigarette is now gone from your bloodstream.
                    Your blood now carries a normal amount of oxygen.
                    24 Hours
                    Your chance of a heart attack is lower.
                    48 Hours
                    Damaged nerve endings start to re-grow.
                    Your sense of smell and taste have improved.
                    2 Weeks to 3 Months
                    Your circulation is better.
                    Walking and physical activity is easier.
                    Lung function increases up to thirty percent.
                    I to 9 Months
                    You cough less.
                    You have more energy.
                    You don't become short of breath as easily.
                    The cilia re-grow in your lungs and you will have less phlegm and infection.
                    1Year
                    Your heart attack risk has fallen to the halfway mark between that of a current smoker and that of someone who has never smoked.
                    5 Years
                    If you used to smoke a pack a day, you have now cut your risk of dying of lung cancer in half.
                    Your risk of heart attack and stroke is approaching that of a nonsmoker.
                    You have cut your risk of mouth, throat and esophageal cancer by half.
                    10 Years
                    Your chance of dying from lung cancer is almost as low as a nonsmoker's.
                    Your risk of mouth, throat, esophageal, kidney and pancreatic cancer continues to fall.
                    10 to 15 Years
                    Your risk of dying from any cause is almost the same as that of someone who never smoked.

                    https://www.facebook.com/john.baxter.1213986

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                    • #11
                      I smoked for about 30 years and I quit smoking cold turkey in 1993. After three days, my wife noted the "rattling" had gone from my chest while I was sleeping. I could also take a deep breath with no pain nor coughing. I thought of smoking for a while and even liked being around people smoking as it smelled good. After a couple of months, people smoking really irritated my sinuses. Now, if anyone smokes, I can smell the pungent odor of their breath and clothing across the room.

                      I swore I would never harass anyone who smokes and I still abide by that today. There's enough information available about smoking without my adding any warnings.

                      I will encourage anyone to stop smoking that wants and can guarantee only one thing: "It won't be easy but it'll be worth it!"

                      Good luck,

                      Millard
                      ''Life's tough... it's even tougher if you're stupid!'' -- John Wayne

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                      • #12
                        recently a close friend had to have some skin grafts. I learned from the surgeon, that a person who smokes, more so for the male than female smoker, skin grafts and skin flaps, do not work as well if you smoke. healing of the skin for a tobacco smoker is not very good as a rule according to what I learn from a plastic surgeon.

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                        • #13
                          I quit almost 32 years ago and at that time I thought I felt good, can't imagine what my life would be like now. My dad was a 3 pack a day smoker, I wish I knew what the doc told him but he quit overnight. You can do anything you set your mind to!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jody View Post
                            recently a close friend had to have some skin grafts. I learned from the surgeon, that a person who smokes, more so for the male than female smoker, skin grafts and skin flaps, do not work as well if you smoke. healing of the skin for a tobacco smoker is not very good as a rule according to what I learn from a plastic surgeon.
                            You are right, Jody. Our plastic surgeon will not even consider doing a flap if you have not stopped tobacco product use for at least 4 weeks, and promise to remain tobacco free for the duration of the healing. Of course the 6-8 weeks of bedrest on our SCI unit (no smoking) after a flap makes this sort of automatic. Nicotine patches and gum are not allowed as medication since that causes the same vasoconstriction that smoking does.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I had to quit smoking five years ago to get a skin graft done and I haven't started back up at all. It's been really nice not having to worry about smelling nasty or being able to afford it, especially considering the price of cigarettes to safe. I don't miss it at all
                              C-5/6, 7-9-2000
                              Scottsdale, AZ

                              Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

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