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Collagen urethra and weak pelvic floor?

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    Collagen urethra and weak pelvic floor?

    Hi, although I'm new to Care Cure, I was an "old" New Mobility poster. Anyway, I have been a t-9 para for almost 40 years. After being blessed for years with no bladder problems I now have problems with a prolapsed uterus which makes it harder to control bladder accidents in between cathing. I do intermittent cathing. So now with the weaker pelvic floor it seems my other organs have pushed the uterus and it is putting the squeeze on my bladder. I went to a so called specialist in urogynecology who told me since I was paralyzed they couldn't operate on me because I wouldn't be able to feel an infection (!!!) Really, I'm not making this up!! He went on to recommend an indwelling catheter. When I said I was worried about the extra risk of infection and other things with an indwelling he told me there was no risk of infection. (By now I felt he really didn't know what he was talking about.) He suggested collagen around the urethra to prevent leaking in between cathing. Well, since I do cath I feel that the collagen might cause more problems than it would help. I feel it might be harder to insert the catheter.

    Anyone have any thoughts on this?

    Thanks!
    I have a hard time deciphering the fine line between boredom and
    hunger.

    #2
    I did collagen injections (at the lowest dose) and I didn't really think they made any difference. I'll probably give it a try again at a higher dose. I didn't notice any difference in cathing.

    When did you get the prolapsed uterus? Did you have children post-SCI? Hope you don't mind the questions, you can PM if you'd like. My ob/gyn said that if that were to eventually happen to me, they would do a hysterectomy.
    Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will. -Mahatma Gandhi

    Comment


      #3
      Hi USCMolly, thanks for your reply.

      I had 2 children post SCI. I was paralyzed at the age of 12 and had my children when I was 20 and 23. I'm happy to answer any quesitons about being paralyzed and pregnant!

      One thing I noticed about reading this site is a lot of ppl take ditropan or some other drug to relax the bladder. It's so funny that none of my doctors recommended drugs first. I've always wanted to do things "naturally" but I'm ready to try ditropan. I have an appt with my general doctor on Monday. Ditropan would be much easier than a hysterectomy (which I wouldn't do unless extreme conditions existed.) I have Kaiser insurance so I'm forced to use the doctors at Kaiser and unfortunately I haven't found anyone who is familiar with SCI.

      Thanks!
      I have a hard time deciphering the fine line between boredom and
      hunger.

      Comment


        #4
        Hi,
        I have heard of collagen used in women for treatment of leaking but I have no direct experience with this.The first step is a trial dose to see if you have any allergies to the collagen before they would inject into your bladder.
        Let's see if others have experiences with this.

        AAD
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

        Comment


          #5
          I would definitely give ditropan a try before anything else. Good luck, Ivy!
          ____________________

          "We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek."
          - Barack Obama

          Comment


            #6
            The drs office injected some collagen into my forearm. It left a bump for about 2 weeks, and now its completely gone... seems like my body gets rid of it quickly.
            I have a hard time deciphering the fine line between boredom and
            hunger.

            Comment


              #7
              I started taking the Ditropan on Monday and I still can't believe it's working. It's not completely perfect but I only had 1 incident which may have been caused by needing to have a bm. But anyway, I'm going to cancel the collagen injections and just go with the Ditropan for a while.

              Yes! This makes me happy! This drug is a better solution.
              I have a hard time deciphering the fine line between boredom and
              hunger.

              Comment


                #8
                Hi, Ivy! Long time no see.

                That doctor really has no clue about SCI, so if the ditropan ends up not working out (though it seems to be - yay!) I'd look for a different doctor.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I know a few people who have used the collagen and were happy with it and others who weren't. I would definitely try the medications first and since the ditropan is working- great.

                  CKF
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    It's kinda crazy but the ditropan has some side effects I just can't live with. First of all it acts as a diuretic for me. After I take a pill I produce a lot of urine so I have to cath every hour and get about 16 ounces each time. I think that's all my bladder can comfortably hold. Then I get dry mouth and have to drink more and then pee more (its a vicious cycle!!). Plus I can't sleep. I'm going to try 1/4 of a pill today and see if it works and if I can handle the side effects.

                    But regardless, I've decided against the collagen. I'm resigned to spending most of my life in the bathroom! I'll continue to try different things.
                    I have a hard time deciphering the fine line between boredom and
                    hunger.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      There's Detrol LA and others to try.
                      Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                      T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                      Comment


                        #12
                        There are a number of anticholenergic medications including Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Detrol, Detrol LA, Sanctura, Vesicare, etc. Some work better than others for individuals. Some cause less side effects than others fir select individuals. In addition. other medications which have an anticholenergic side effect such as tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine especially) can be used in addition to the anticholenergics.

                        Ditropan can also be administered as a bladder instillation 1-2X daily at the end of your catheterization. This is a good way to avoid the side effects of taking it orally.

                        Botox should also be considered if you have problems with low capacity and high pressures in your bladder and cannot tolerate the meds, or they don't work for you.

                        I have know several women with SCI who have had slings and collegen injections. The injection in your arm was to see if you were allergic to it. That takes up to 4 weeks, so if you have no inflammation or lumps now that is actually a good sign that it might work for you.

                        Regardless, it sounds like that urologist is not the one for you. I would really recommend you see a neurologic urologist who knows SCI and perhaps also specializes in female incontinence. There are a number of these specialists out there. I am concerned with the comments the one you saw made about surgery and indwelling catheters and personally would not be comfortable with them managing your issues.

                        If Kaiser cannot meet your needs with an appropriate in-plan specialist, you are entitled to request a referral to an out-of-plan physician. It helps if you do a little research first so you know which physician you are asking for in the community. They have to consider a request like this, and provide you a response in writing (which you can also appeal if denied).

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                        Comment

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