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Nurse/anyone........blood pressure fluctuations and nausea???

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    Nurse/anyone........blood pressure fluctuations and nausea???

    Does anyone else get very nauseous when they have blood pressure fluctuations? Is that normal?? I get extremely nauseous.

    Becky
    T8-9 according to latest scoring.......
    since 1/3/04

    I am the best at being me. No matter how that happens to be!!

    #2
    bcsimpsons,

    Normal with Autonomic Dysreflexia-Hyperreflexia.

    When your blood pressure goes up, does your heartrate go down?

    Joe

    Comment


      #3
      Actually, nausea and vomiting are rare reactions to autonomic dysreflexia. I have not seen this. While some people have a slow pulse with AD, many have a fast pulse so that does not determine if the high blood pressure is AD or not.

      It is common to have nausea and vomiting with a very low blood pressure (hypotension), esp. if the blood pressure drops suddenly.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #4
        Mine always drops when I first get up and with that I'm always nauseated and anxious.Drinking water seems to help my bp to rise back to normal.

        Comment


          #5
          I sometimes get nauseous and dizzy when I lift myself up out of the tub. It passes pretty quickly. My blood pressure is typically on the low end of normal.

          Comment


            #6
            Although I have lowish blood pressure, and fainted in rehab, I didn't tend to feel sick. However, I know others in rehab did get nauseous with low blood pressure. One guy puked when he got in the standing frame.

            I have never felt nauseous with dysreflexia.

            Comment


              #7
              KLD, yes the nausea is when my blood pressure drastically drops quickly. However I still am slightly sick to my stomach when it is elevated. By low I mean 70/40ish and high I am talking about 110/180ish.

              Becky
              T8-9 according to latest scoring.......
              since 1/3/04

              I am the best at being me. No matter how that happens to be!!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by bcsimpsons View Post
                KLD, yes the nausea is when my blood pressure drastically drops quickly. However I still am slightly sick to my stomach when it is elevated. By low I mean 70/40ish and high I am talking about 110/180ish.

                Becky
                Please check that last number. It is physiologically impossible to have a blood pressure of 110/180. This would mean that your blood pressure is 110 when your heart is beating and 180 when it is at rest. This is called a negative pulse pressure and would result in no blood circulating in your body.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                  Please check that last number. It is physiologically impossible to have a blood pressure of 110/180. This would mean that your blood pressure is 110 when your heart is beating and 180 when it is at rest. This is called a negative pulse pressure and would result in no blood circulating in your body.

                  (KLD)
                  oops, KLD your right. I reversed the numbers. This morning it was 162/102.

                  Becky
                  T8-9 according to latest scoring.......
                  since 1/3/04

                  I am the best at being me. No matter how that happens to be!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Since your injury is so low, I assume you are not having AD. It sounds like you have hypertension, which can be essential hypertension or caused by a medical problem such as an adrenal tumor. You need to see a good cardiologist and get this under control. You are at risk of stroke, heart damage, renal damage and eye damage with uncontrolled high blood pressures such as this.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      There are two reasons to associate nausea with Autonomic Dysreflexia- Hyperreflexia. The increase in catecholimines and adrenalin will contribute as will the spasticity of the innervated smooth muscle tissue and abdominal muscles.

                      Dysreflexia (underractive) is the heartrate slowing down (bradycardia) to counter the Hyperreflexive (overactive) rise in blood pressure (hypertention).

                      Level of injury is not contentious with Autonomic Dysreflexia-Hyperreflexia because the etiology can exist outside the spinal column. Exiting nerve root impingement in the thoracic region, impingement of the Vagus nerve or efferent-afferent pathways of the innervated smooth muscle tissue.

                      To me what is being describe is hypertention and hypotention.

                      Joe

                      Comment


                        #12
                        That is not correct. There is mimimal increase in catecholimines with even severe AD. This has been shown in a number of studies.

                        Note in the publication below that N&V is not even listed as a rare symptom of AD. You can get some decrease in GI motility with prolonged AD (hours) but this would rarely be an early symptom.

                        While bradycardia is most common with AD, because the vagus is trying to lower the blood pressure by decreasing pulse and stroke volume of the heart, it is also very common (nearly half the time) to have tachycardia instead.

                        Level of injury is a significant factor in AD. You must have an intact pathway from the brain to the major sympathic (splancnic) nerve outflow to enable your brain to counteract the peripheral vasoconstriction caused by stimulation of the sympathetic reflexes by ascending pain fiber. Since that outflow is primarily at or below T6, those who are primarily at risk for AD have injuries at that level or above. While it has been reported as low as T10, it would be exceedingly unlikely to occur in someone with a T12 incomplete injury.

                        I would refer you to this publication for a complete description of AD, and a good list of references as well:

                        http://www.pva.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=7657

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          KLD,
                          I have made an appointment with my cardiologist. Thank you for the suggestion. I was not thinking it was AD because of my level of injury. I just want to reiterate that my b/p does not remain elevated, it fluctuates to the extrememe high numbers as described then rapidly drops. Can you have hyper and hypotension at the same time?

                          Becky
                          T8-9 according to latest scoring.......
                          since 1/3/04

                          I am the best at being me. No matter how that happens to be!!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Yes, this is called intermittent or paroxysmal hypertension. It is difficult to manage, and your SCI makes you more at risk for both essential hypertension as well as for the orthostatic low blood pressure (hypotension) take make the former much more difficult to properly manage.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              KLD,
                              Thanks so much for the info. That makes me feel better (sort of ). Is it "normal" to have never had a problem with b/p before then all of a sudden? I mean my injury is five years old so it just seems a little odd that I have never had b/p problems before.

                              Becky
                              T8-9 according to latest scoring.......
                              since 1/3/04

                              I am the best at being me. No matter how that happens to be!!

                              Comment

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