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flap surgery clinitron bed at home?????

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    flap surgery clinitron bed at home?????

    Well I'm most likely going to get the flap surgery done. After two years of trying to heal this thing. My question is has anyone been able to get a clinitron bed in there house after surgery? Has anyone had insurance cover it?( I have Medicare as primary and horizon blue cross blue shield as secondary) I am seeing a plastic surgeon quite far from my house and really don’t want to go to a sub acute facility for six plus weeks if I can be with my family at home. Honestly for me having to go to a nursing home is the number one factor in not getting the surgery done in the first place.
    Diane
    Familyfunpowersports.com

    #2
    bump!
    Diane
    Familyfunpowersports.com

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      #3
      I just had bilateral flaps done in July, stayed in the hospital for three weeks, went to a nursing home like place for six weeks before I ran out of days to be in a nursing facility by my insurance company and was sent home still on a Clinitron bed. The first four or five weeks after you get out of the hospital are very hard and would be very difficult for your family to handle every one of your needs. You truly are completely restricted to bed rest, not even being able to sit above 30° for at least four weeks or until the doctor releases you to do so so you even have to be fed that whole time. Plus you may still want some IV narcotic painkillers. I had a PCA for six weeks, or the kind of pump where all I had to do was hit a button and it would give me a dose of Dilauded, just to help calm the neuro pain that is aggravated from stitches and all the flap surgery done underneath the skin
      C-5/6, 7-9-2000
      Scottsdale, AZ

      Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

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        #4
        i have had a clinitron bed for 7 months because of sore on but. i have united health care ins bed cost them 3200 a month. worth it imho good luck it can be dome

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          #5
          SCI-Nurse, what other types of beds are options for post-flap surgery other than the Clinitron?
          vgrafen

          My book, 'Scouring the globe for a cure: a disabled man's experiences with stem cell treatment' is available at Booklocker at the following address:

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            #6
            There are several air loss beds that can also be used, but in my opinion, the clinitron is still the best for what we are talking about.

            It is difficult to do it all at home, and you need to take into account everything that you need to do everyday for yourself. You will be down completely for at least 4 weeks, maybe longer. Keep that in mind when you ask your family for their assistance. Also, you need to speak with your physician about the methods that he recommends for pain/spasticity control immediately after surgery. If he prefers a PCA type method, then you need to also make sure that you can get that covered at home.

            Anyone else out there have any other words of wisdom?

            CKF
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #7
              i had one at home paid by medicare for over a year.

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                #8
                For a year!? Why? That seems kind of ridiculous if you couldn't get the sore to heal for a year post surgery or without surgery. That had to kill your electric bill. I know it sure raised mine up when I had the Clinitron at home, not only from the bed but from it increasing the temperature of the house and my air-conditioning having to run more.
                C-5/6, 7-9-2000
                Scottsdale, AZ

                Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                  There are several air loss beds that can also be used, but in my opinion, the clinitron is still the best for what we are talking about.

                  It is difficult to do it all at home, and you need to take into account everything that you need to do everyday for yourself. You will be down completely for at least 4 weeks, maybe longer. Keep that in mind when you ask your family for their assistance. Also, you need to speak with your physician about the methods that he recommends for pain/spasticity control immediately after surgery. If he prefers a PCA type method, then you need to also make sure that you can get that covered at home.

                  Anyone else out there have any other words of wisdom?

                  CKF
                  Bed Sores are curable - 3 engineers put a bed together 20 years ago to cure bedsores and were unable to get it into the market. There are 2 components of this....reduce the pressure by spreading the load of the body over your shadow, and decrease the shear stress by making long balloons on the bed that move as your body moves. Then stay in the bed for 30 -45 days and you are cured. This is called the Douglas Air Floatation Bed. There are only a few in existence but perhaps one could be found and I have one at home, not being used at the moment. It's been tested at the VA Hospital in Houston, and its regularly been in the burn center in Tacoma washington.

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                    #10
                    Clinitron bed at home

                    Wow! When I first saW this thread I got very excited to see the posts as I have bed needing a Clinitron at home too. I have a stage 4 pressure sore right below my butt in hip area. From Dec. to May I was in the hospital and 2 rehabs. and the whole time I was on a Clinitron bed. I saw a plastic surgeon 3 times in this period but he kept saying it had to get smaller before he could do it. The sore was very slowly getting smaller. Thought if I could get the Clintron at home than I could go home. The case worker looked into it and said that Medicare would pay for it. (I also have Medicaid) then, about a week before I was suppose to go home, my case worker said that I would have to go home on a low air bed and after I get 5 home nurse visits I would get the Clinitron. My nurse came out 5 days in a row so I could get it fast. Well, I have been home almost 2 months and no Clinitron. Someone was wrong when they said Medicare would pay for it. Now my dr. Has to write a detailed letter to try to get me the bed. After I got home the sore got worse but now my nurse said it got smaller by 2 cm. So at least it is slowly getting better on this bed. I have to be put on my side. Alot though which I didn't have to on the Clinitron.

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                      #11
                      My father has been in a Clinitron for close to two years. He has been a paraplegic for 18 years, and has had an open pressure wound on the right ishium (lower buttock/upper thigh) for over two years that hasn't healed as of yet, but is getting better. He doesn't have diabetes or any other diagnosed illness at 70 years old. What I, as his son, would say about the Clinitron is that it might already have done its work if my father had listened to doctor's orders. Unfortunately, he thought the bed was "like medicine", and in his own head allotted it a period of time to make him "better". He's been through 3 surgeries (de-breedings/sp?) because of stubborness,but is now improving steadily since he's been sticking to dr's orders. What I will say about the Clinitron is that it does work! In FACT, my dad, after his doctor filling out the monthly paperwork for well over a year, now actually OWNS the bed because apparently Medicare has made enough payments, and that's what happens. He only has a year warranty/service contract after that, but that's still not bad in my opinion. He's in PA if anyone is wondering (because I know your State sometimes matters in these sitautions); but if you want to talk or need some advice about the bed, I've pretty much been through the ringer!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I am interested what the doctors orders were to your father. I too have a pressure ulcer that I have had for over a year. I recently got a Clinitron bed and have been told several different things regarding its therapeutic application. The PAs at the hospital said that you must still be vigilant about repositioning, and allowed that it was "therapeutic" but not "cureative". Their main point was that the bed will help to not create any more sores, but that it won't help the current sore heal. This is contrary to other views, particularly the PT/rep from Hill-Rom, whom I spoke to today and she contradicted this and said that the Clinitron is DEFINITELY therapeutic and WILL help the sore heal. I suspect it is somewhere in the middle, but am interested in hearing more about your father's progress/success with this bed.

                        Many thank.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          We rarely, if ever, use an air-fluidized bed (like a Clinitron) for conservative management (non-surgical) treatment of pressure ulcers. We use them only for post-flap care.

                          A bed alone, any kind of bed, is not a cure for pressure ulcers. It must still be combined with the right type of local wound therapy (dressings, etc.), wound debridement, proper nutrition and monitoring of labs, turning, and treatment of underlying osteomyelitis if it exists. Without these being in place, the wound, even on an air-fluidized bed, is likely to remain a chronic open wound, and not heal.

                          Bed company reps are sales people, regardless of their professional license or background. I take everything they claim about their products with a huge handful of salt, and skepticism.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I am not using the bed as a sole treatment.
                            I remain out of my chair, reposition often and have been using a VAC again for the last 2 weeks.
                            I was most curious of the writers father's doctors orders, both before and after the Clinitron.
                            I'm almost at the point of needing flap surgery, and hope to avoid that.

                            Thanks for your advice.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by shard View Post
                              I am not using the bed as a sole treatment.
                              I remain out of my chair, reposition often and have been using a VAC again for the last 2 weeks.
                              I was most curious of the writers father's doctors orders, both before and after the Clinitron.
                              I'm almost at the point of needing flap surgery, and hope to avoid that.

                              Thanks for your advice.
                              AAA41 has not visited this site since he posted that first and only post on our forum on 12/15/11. I doubt he will see your question here.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

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