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    Idiot dog licking pressure sore

    I have a small pressure sore on my foot, and I also have a less-than-genius-level dog who loves to lick the sore. Good or bad?

    #2
    Couldn't tell you if it's good or bad.. but it's doing it to keep it clean and help it heal.

    This is a snippet on the web some place..
    "
    There are a couple of reasons for this. First, it’s true that dog saliva has antibiotic properties. Specifically, dog saliva contains lysozyme, an enzyme that lyses and destroys harmful bacteria. This means the enzyme attaches to the bacterial cell wall - particularly gram-positive bacteria - and weakens it, leading to rupture.
    The second reason is direct stimulation of the tissues and small [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]blood [COLOR=blue! important]vessels[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] surrounding the wound site. This helps to increase blood flow and promote the growth of new capillaries, while the blood brings white cells, [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]platelets[/COLOR][/COLOR]

    , growth factors and other of the body’s natural healing agents to the wound site."
    Rick Brauer or just call me - Mr B

    http://www.riseadventures.org

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      #3
      I don't have time to check out the links with this but my only thought is that dogs also lick their ass...and I would think that would create a lot of germs in his mouth...the reason dog bites can be dangerous...

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        #4
        Good. For thousands of years, people have used dogs to, yes, clean their wounds. Dog saliva isn't bad for you, and while I am no doctor/nurse, and while the practice may seem unseemly, he's essentially debriding you. Strange, yeah, but I wouldn't freak out about it; however, ya should go get it treated...
        vgrafen

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          #5
          Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
          I have a small pressure sore on my foot, and I also have a less-than-genius-level dog who loves to lick the sore. Good or bad?
          Your dog isn't licking you, he/she is tasting you. I would keep that animal well feed.
          Stupidity ain't illegal, but it sure is inconvenient.


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            #6
            - A dog licks itself to clean itself.
            - Germs inside the dog's mouth would not affect humans negatively. We're not suspectible to the same germs. (Rabies is a virus and not a germ.)
            - Dog's saliva does have a cleansing property to it.
            - Dogs lick to show affection; and while it seems sick, he may be tasting the sore's taste in much the same way humans can taste their blood.

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              #7
              After a very quick Google this would seem to be the middle of the road opinion......

              Some dog owners will say that a dog’s saliva actually contains an enzyme that promotes healing and will encourage their dog to lick their cuts or wounds. This fact is true, but the enzyme only works on the wounds of dogs and does not help humans at all. Therefore, you should not encourage your dog to lick open wounds or cuts on you as this will only increase your chance of infection.

              In closing, while your pet passing on and illness or parasite to you is unlikely if you keep them properly vaccinated and tested, it may still be a good idea to discourage licking in order to reduce the chances even more.

              www.articlezone.com

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                #8
                Good post, Timaru.

                It's probably not the best idea to let your dog lick your wound, but he's not doing it because he's an idiot. It's instinctual as dogs are decended from wolves, and a wolf will lick his wounds as well as the wounds of others in the pack, if allowed. You're a part of your dog's pack, that's all.

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                  #9
                  My dog licks my hand that is clawed up. Never the other one. He gets all into it, holds it with his front feet. I have a feeling he's trying to cure it. My son made his hand into a claw and Dingo was not interested.
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                    #10
                    Hi,

                    I hear what everyone is saying but I would not recommend it either. It could be my bias but I am of the school that dogs come in contact with alot of outside germs,etc

                    If you want to encourage the close contact, I would wrap it in gauze dressing and if he/she licked that, the sore would be protected.

                    AAd
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      #11
                      I agree with the Nurse. The dog loves you and feels like it is helping you. But what is good for the dog may not be good for you. Cover it up.

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                        #12
                        I wouldn't encourage this either. Very sweet .. but if it's a full thickness wound, no way in hell because of the risk of e-coli.

                        Is your dog an indoor dog or outdoor? What kind of dog?
                        Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                          I wouldn't encourage this either. Very sweet .. but if it's a full thickness wound, no way in hell because of the risk of e-coli.

                          Is your dog an indoor dog or outdoor? What kind of dog?
                          My dog is getting a kick out of all these replies. All she thinks about is food, going for walks, being petted, and barking at things for no reason. She doesn't know a thing about medicine. She is part shepherd part spaniel. I really don't know what goes through her brain most of the time though. I think she just likes to lick things because she likes the taste not because she is trying to be a healer. She is pretty smart about getting food though I'll give her that.

                          One time though she was barking furiously for months at a corner of my carpet. I thought it was just her being foolish for no reason. But it turned out there was a water leak deep underneath the carpet, so had I listened to her I'd have saved a lot of money. Sometimes she will redeem herself like that.
                          Last edited by xsfxsf; 30 Jan 2009, 11:59 PM.

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                            #14
                            I had a blister on the back of my heel, and I caught my dog licking it when it was more in the healing stage! I scolded her right away. I was paranoid afterwards since my dog sleeps under my chair all the time & I wouldnt be able to feel if she snuck back to doing it again.

                            My dog eats anything & everything..there is no way I'd let her lick something I was trying to keep clean and heal.
                            Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

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                              #15
                              the doctors

                              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                              Hi,

                              I hear what everyone is saying but I would not recommend it either. It could be my bias but I am of the school that dogs come in contact with alot of outside germs,etc

                              If you want to encourage the close contact, I would wrap it in gauze dressing and if he/she licked that, the sore would be protected.

                              AAd
                              Doggie Kisses

                              Dogs often show their affection with sloppy wet “kisses,” but Dr. Jim warns that canine mouths contain bacteria called Camplyobacter, which they get from smelling each other’s backsides. The bacteria will cause the stomach flu in humans and each year more than 200,000 Americans contract the virus after their dogs lick their mouths. Ringworm can also be passed orally, so it’s best to keep the kisses for your human friends!

                              http://www.thedoctorstv.com/main/sho...ction=synopsis

                              i watched this episode. they say a dogs mouth isn't very clean.

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