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    Cold Feet

    Hi, I'm not sure whether to be worried about my son'sfeet being ice cold. He has a T4 paralysis. It was the first really cold day and he was out wearing leather shoes. Came back in took a shower and was in bed at 4pm. His caregiver gave him the stretching exercises as usual, and I , his mom, repeated them at about 8pm. but these feet of his would not warm to their usual temperature. So I put a buckwheat pillow, heated in microwave and it helped warm them. They are ok now. Was it a circulation problem do you think- or just cold from being out earlier and never warmed up?

    #2
    I think that's typical. My feet and legs do the same thing and it takes a long time to get them warmed back up.

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      #3
      I live in snow country and do get concerned about amazingly cold feet.
      Here are my conclusions and solutions
      I think the blood has cooled down traversing my lower leg that is basically bone , vessel , and skin. I could put all the down booties I want on the foot but really it is the whole leg that has to stay warm so the blood that is delivered is warm when it reaches the foot.
      So , from Nov. to March, I wear long underwear even indoors and this seems to help.

      There is also a product called Hotronics, that is a battery operated foot bed warmer that me and my para friends use while skiing or snow blowing.

      I also for the winter have insulated pants - although definately not a fashion statement.

      Jon

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        #4
        Hello,

        I agree that it is probably from being outdoors and would recommend more warm clothing items as above when outdoors. A caution for using warmer products as they should not be applied for extended periods of time.

        The clues to observe for that might suggest circulatory problems are cold, bluish extremities that stay that way for extended periods despite warming procedures, pressing on the skin of the extremity and not seeing blanching (where the skin turns white but then returns to its normal skin color).

        AAD
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          At any given time, Rob is ice cold below he's injury level. We could be inside all day and he feels comfortable but his legs are cold to the touch. It used to drive me crazy and I was always trying to warm them up, now its just one of those SCI things.

          I would try to take extra caution outside during winter though. Last year, we were outside for an extended amount of time and when we came in Rob's left foot was a funky shade of purple and freaky cold.

          Comment


            #6
            Seems lots of us have freakishly cold feet and legs. I've always joked that it's like a built in fridge, all the nice warm blood passes through the freezer in my feet and next thing I'm blue and frozen while everyone else is fine!

            Arndog, I looked at the hotronics...great idea. Do you or any of your para friends have trouble with pressure sores or burns from having these in your shoes though?

            Those of use with no sensation in our feet have to be so careful

            cheerio
            "The impossible is just that which hasn't been done yet.Impossible is nothing"

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              #7
              Miss Sept - you have to be careful with the hottronics and at first I was wore it in the house with a thick sock between the footbed and my foot and tried at four levels. I did that a few times before taking it out on the road. But the answer is , no, it doesn't get that warm that you would burn your skin unless one wore a super thin liner as your only sock.
              No pressure sores either - it is built into a shoe liner.

              You are right , you got to be careful about your skin - a few years ago I got into a steam shower and had my foot near the steam vent - I looked down and saw all these funny blisters - not smart.

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                #8
                My son wears uggs shearling ascot shoe like slippers year round. That way he doesn't need to fool with putting on socks and his feet stay warm.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by bevanne View Post
                  My son wears uggs shearling ascot shoe like slippers year round. That way he doesn't need to fool with putting on socks and his feet stay warm.
                  I have the Uggs tall and they are the best at keeping my feet/calves warm.
                  A dolla makes me holla, honey boo boo! - borrowed from Honey boo boo child

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                    #10
                    I have frozen feet and lower legs from about October to April every year. No health hazard, but definitely unpleasant as the cold sometimes radiates up to cause teeth chattering. Elevating them helps some, as the blood flow doesn't have to fight gravity quite as much. Warm fuzzy slippers are a must for inside. LL Bean has some good ones with sheepskin and fleece lining.

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                      #11
                      I have cold feet and legs mostly at night.It seems to make me feel colder so I'm always freezing its very unpleasant to the touch i have a jacuzzi and i love it for that reason it warms my legs up for at least a couple hours.
                      Diane
                      Familyfunpowersports.com

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                        #12
                        huh, I thought I was alone in this cataloger.... the coldness in my legs/feet cause my AD. I never knew that, just found it out... my body doesn't adjust to temp... didn't know that until recently either. Anyways, glad for the post.

                        bbs

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                          #13
                          I've had this problem for a very long time, even when I was walking. It's less extreme than you folks describe, doesn't really hurt, but it's uncomfortable and oddly colored, and a warm when I sit on them. Are you saying it's neurological rather than just circulation? My nifty new doctor was going to try some kind of stimulation -- dorsal column stem I think -- but I got preoccupied with other annoyances to deal with. Can anyone let me know why this is paar fomr the SCI course, if those reasons can explain it when I still was walking, and if dorsal column stim might help?

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                            #14
                            my doctor said that it's because I (and probably all sci's or most) cannot adjust to temperature changes... our temps are not regulated.
                            I don't believe it has anything to do with circulation, per say.. although, that's just with me, I don't know maybe you should get yours checked just in case. I'm not very old, so hopefully THAT is ok with me, at least

                            take care and good luck
                            bbs

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks. I don't think in my case it can be just temperature adjustment because I think I still can adjust temperature -- I can swim in a cool pool and though I shiver a lot after getting out, otherwise I'm fine. And like for others, it's especially bad in bed. Even in summer, when it's warm, my feet are cold. I sleep with the big heating pad across the bottom of my bed, though I have pretty good sensation and I know others have warned about this being dangerous if you don't have good sensation. I remembered I posted about this a couple years ago (below) -- no responses.

                              Yes thanks bbs, toasty tootsies to all.

                              ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              What makes my feet always achingly cold, and such a lovely shade of violet? I used to have it to a much lesser extreme in both hands and feet, and it went away after my cervical laminectomy. It came back with a vengeance in just my feet after my fall—incomplete cervical injury, herniated lumbar discs.

                              Elevating my feet doesn’t seem to help. Any other ideas?

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