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    #46
    Originally posted by rybread View Post
    Besides that, I gatefold relatively easy and when I gatefold it's really hard to warm backup, especially when you're shivering.
    gatefold?
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

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      #47
      We keep the house very warm.
      Alan

      Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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        #48
        I am only cold when I'm a jerk.

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          #49
          Originally posted by gbusinelle View Post
          CAUTION: DON'T PUT A HEATWRAP ANYWHERE YOU CAN'T FEEL HEAT. THEY CAN BURN YOU.

          I only have hot/cold sensation from the neck up. So, when my neck is warm, I'm warm. Whenever I'm going to be somewhere cold (anywhere outside of my house basically), I put a Thermocare heat wrap on my neck. It lasts 7 hours or so.

          CAUTION: DON'T PUT A HEATWRAP ANYWHERE YOU CAN'T FEEL HEAT. THEY CAN BURN YOU.
          yeah i should have emphasized that more in my response.
          Never take life seriously, nobody gets out alive anyway

          Frank's blog:
          http://www.franktalk-scurry.blogspot.com
          My regular blog:
          http://www.ithinkithinktoomuchblog.blogspot.com

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            #50
            I think a lot of it as well has to with the fact that our sci has made us sedentary.
            T7-8 since Feb 2005

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              #51
              Jesse is also cold and I always want to give him suggestions but he says I just dont understand. I encourage him to wear socks and he tells me it wont do him any good. Is this true? Our weather in MN does get extremely cold and he will never wear socks, not even when the temp is 10 and 20 degrees. Do I sit on top of him and put the socks on him myself or is he right?

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                #52
                It will probably make a difference to his actual body temp, even though he won;t notice his feet feeling warm. I have gotten very chilled when outside for too long in thin slacks. I realized later how much body heat I lost through my legs. But if I go outside with my legs bundled up, they still feel cold to me.

                (I am assuming you mean barefoot inside, when temps are that cold outside? Cuz he could still get frostbite outside barefoot like that.)
                T7-8 since Feb 2005

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                  #53
                  Originally posted by sjean423 View Post
                  It will probably make a difference to his actual body temp, even though he won;t notice his feet feeling warm. I have gotten very chilled when outside for too long in thin slacks. I realized later how much body heat I lost through my legs. But if I go outside with my legs bundled up, they still feel cold to me.

                  (I am assuming you mean barefoot inside, when temps are that cold outside? Cuz he could still get frostbite outside barefoot like that.)
                  No, he NEVER wears socks........inside or outside.

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                    #54
                    Clothing (socks, long underwear, sweats, hats, etc. ) all help to prevent convective heat loss. People with SCI are often cold because their hypothalamus (body temperature regulation area of the brain) can no longer control such heat conservation mechanisms as shivering (which produces muscle heat) and vasoconstriction (which keeps blood warm in your core). If you are vasodilated, you loose body heat by convection much more easily.

                    In hot weather, normally the hypothalamus would also regulate sweating (for evaporative cooling) and vasodilation to bring blood to the surface of the skin and allow more convective cooling.

                    It is not that the person has poorer circulation, or a defect of their hypothalamus, but that the hypothalamus is connected to your body through the spinal cord, and most of the autonomic nerves that do all of the above leave the cord at or below T6.

                    Hypothermia and hypothermia as well as frost bite can occur more easily in those with SCI. Jesse needs to bundle up in the cold (including socks) or risk loosing some toes or worse.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      #55
                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                      Clothing (socks, long underwear, sweats, hats, etc. ) all help to prevent convective heat loss. People with SCI are often cold because their hypothalamus (body temperature regulation area of the brain) can no longer control such heat conservation mechanisms as shivering (which produces muscle heat) and vasoconstriction (which keeps blood warm in your core). If you are vasodilated, you loose body heat by convection much more easily.

                      In hot weather, normally the hypothalamus would also regulate sweating (for evaporative cooling) and vasodilation to bring blood to the surface of the skin and allow more convective cooling.

                      It is not that the person has poorer circulation, or a defect of their hypothalamus, but that the hypothalamus is connected to your body through the spinal cord, and most of the autonomic nerves that do all of the above leave the cord at or below T6.

                      Hypothermia and hypothermia as well as frost bite can occur more easily in those with SCI. Jesse needs to bundle up in the cold (including socks) or risk loosing some toes or worse.

                      (KLD)
                      I was waiting for you to post.

                      Glad you've explained it.

                      Still wonder why I sweat below injury tho, while still feeling cold. strange.

                      Altho I hate pain medicine, I noticed vicodines work in warming me up and relaxing my legs (when 4ap and baclofen don't work), unfortunately every time I take it, I get nausea.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        The same mechanism that causes you to feel cold, also causes you to sweat. Something is triggering the hypothalamus to work, but the cord is not regulating the response.

                        Don't know if that helps or not.
                        CKF
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                          The same mechanism that causes you to feel cold, also causes you to sweat. Something is triggering the hypothalamus to work, but the cord is not regulating the response.

                          Don't know if that helps or not.
                          CKF
                          ah got ya. In other words, the socks are triggering my hypothalamus, thus causing me to sweat, however, since my cord is not regulating it (lack of control) I still feel cold.

                          Got it. Thanks guys.

                          last question: Are there any other meds I could take (other than vicodines yack) that could warm me up? We feel cold, but it's neurological, so I assume there is something that can help regulate the hypothalamus, or at least give us SOME control? btw. I am incomplete.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                            Clothing (socks, long underwear, sweats, hats, etc. ) all help to prevent convective heat loss. People with SCI are often cold because their hypothalamus (body temperature regulation area of the brain) can no longer control such heat conservation mechanisms as shivering (which produces muscle heat) and vasoconstriction (which keeps blood warm in your core). If you are vasodilated, you loose body heat by convection much more easily.

                            In hot weather, normally the hypothalamus would also regulate sweating (for evaporative cooling) and vasodilation to bring blood to the surface of the skin and allow more convective cooling.

                            It is not that the person has poorer circulation, or a defect of their hypothalamus, but that the hypothalamus is connected to your body through the spinal cord, and most of the autonomic nerves that do all of the above leave the cord at or below T6.

                            Hypothermia and hypothermia as well as frost bite can occur more easily in those with SCI. Jesse needs to bundle up in the cold (including socks) or risk loosing some toes or worse.

                            (KLD)
                            Thank you thank you thank you. I call that great advice AND ammunition.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              When I lived up north before my injury I remember a rule of thumb "if your feet were cold, you were going to be cold" in other words you're not going to be warm if your feet aren't. I remember it was standard procedure in the winter time to wear two pairs of socks. I also remember delivering newspapers by pulling them on my sled through snow. But that was a different time and the different life but I still make sure my feet are warm.

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                                #60
                                imight,

                                i'm not sure if it warms you up but i take valium with baclofen to control my spasms because they're really bad. 100mgs of baclofen and 6mg of valium spaced throughout the day.
                                Never take life seriously, nobody gets out alive anyway

                                Frank's blog:
                                http://www.franktalk-scurry.blogspot.com
                                My regular blog:
                                http://www.ithinkithinktoomuchblog.blogspot.com

                                Comment

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