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ileostomy vs. colostomy?

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    ileostomy vs. colostomy?

    I am seriously thinking of having a colostomy. I was wondering how long you are usually in the hospital and then after you get home what things do you need to do while everything heals and how long is it usually before you can drive, go back to work etc? any info. would be appreciated!

    #2
    ileostomy vs. colostomy?

    What is the difference in the two and is one better/worse than the other? any details would be appreciated! i have looked up the 2 and cant seem to be able to tell what is different between the two. Thanks!

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      #3
      Originally posted by summergirl89
      What is the difference in the two and is one better/worse than the other? any details would be appreciated! i have looked up the 2 and cant seem to be able to tell what is different between the two. Thanks!
      Ileostomi is a stomi from the small intestine and colostomi is from large intestine(colon).

      I have heard that the iliostomi gives more trouble with diarrhea and constipation and you have to be careful with what you eat. With a colostomi your stool is like before and you can eat what you want.
      TH 12, 43 years post

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        #4
        An Ilieostomy is higher in the intestines. OUtput is more liquid, and more frequent (a little bit, almost all the time, more shortly after eating). I think it is generally done for a medical reason (mine was). Elective would be more likely to be a colostomy. Further down, more "formed" output, and more likely to be output on some sort of schedule (similar to as when ab, you "went" in the morning? or such)., and an empty bag the rest of the time. So a little more control on handling it. Some people actually do a bp with a colostomy ..... irrigate it and really control when they have output.

        If you are considering this, there are some really good threads on "should I get one". You can use the search option on the toolbar, but here are a couple:

        /forum/search.php?searchid=1712570&pp=25&page=2

        /forum/showthread.php?t=56732&highlight=colostomy

        Oh, and I think a colostomy might be healthier, as you have more colon to pass through, and absorb nutrients.

        eta, saw above. I don;t have any trouble with what I eat, but I did have a lot of precautions. They just don;t seem to bother me personally.
        Last edited by sjean423; 28 Aug 2008, 8:14 PM.
        T7-8 since Feb 2005

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          #5
          An ileostomy is from the small intestine and does not use the colon at all. The stool is completely liquid, so of course a bag must be used at all times. Rarely is there a reason to do this procedure unless you have a bowel disease or damage that would require that the large intestine be completely removed. It is more difficult to bag, and and leakage burns the skin more than stool from a colostomy. It is also more difficult to maintain sufficient fluid intake (since most of the water of your stool is absorbed in the large intestine) to prevent dehydration, and some nutrients that are actually absorbed or made in the large intestine can also be lacking. It would be extremely rare to have constipation (or even a soft formed stool) with an ileostomy.

          I will look for some diagrams and post later (got to run right now).

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            #6
            oops. thanks KLD. I edited out colon in my post.

            Mine was done as part of the large was perforated and was leaking into my abdominal cavity. It was meant to be reversible (nothing was removed, just had to heal) but I have chosen not to. I have had issues pre sci, and compounded with a bp, decided that this was the way to go.
            T7-8 since Feb 2005

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              #7
              OK, here is an ileostomy example:


              Here is a colostomy example:


              This is a descending segment colostomy with an appliance (bag) in place:


              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                great info, thanks! making "ileostomy" off list completely now!

                Comment


                  #9
                  An ileostomy is created with your small intestine and a colostomy is created using your large intestine. The majority of people who get ileostomies (according to people I've chatted with at the support group I attend) are for ulcerative colitis or colon cancer that is really high up in the large intestine. The output from a colostomy is way more formed than it is coming from an ileostomy.
                  I had an ileostomy done in January, and it was because only 1/2 of my large intestine was functioning and starting to get tiny tears in the non-functioning part, due to severe constipation (despite being on every laxitive and bowel program you could think of). They took my entire large intestine out, except for 1 1/2 inches of my rectum. Most of the time, the output from my ileostomy is mostly liquid, but if I eat applesauce or peanut butter, it thickens it up a bit. I usually have to empty my pouch 4-5 times a day and change the whole appliance every 3-4 days.
                  Plus, because your large intestine is the main source for absorbing fluids and potassium in your body, you have to drink a lot of fluids throughout the day to avoid dehydration. I have to drink between 10-12 cups a day (which sometimes is hard if you already have bladder problems and leak a lot), and even with that, I still am dehydrated a little bit. Also, you can't take any extended-release or coated pills anymore, because they will just go right through you without dissolving (but you get used to the liquid medicines very quickly). There is also a risk of getting something called "diversion colitis" in the piece of rectum they leave in you, due to it not being active and inflaming frequently.

                  As far as appliances go, the ostomy nurse who was teaching me in the hospital told me that drainable pouches are the only option for ileostomies, due to the amount of time you have to empty the pouch daily. She told me that if you used closed pouches, you'd run out way before you got more from your supplier. People who have colostomies can use closed pouches exclusively or even irrigate the stoma and go pouch free for about a day. There are also pouch covers that are very nice and in several prints and fabrics (they even make some for sex made of silk and crotchless panties with a opening to hold the pouch in the underwear). If you are a wiz on the sewing machine, you can easily make them at home.
                  I am actually very happy I got the surgery done. If I had to get it done again, I'd do it in a heartbeat. You might want to go to the UOAA website and chat with others who have had this surgery (www.uoaa.org) too!

                  Jessie

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by woman from Europe
                    Ileostomi is a stomi from the small intestine and colostomi is from large intestine(colon).

                    I have heard that the iliostomi gives more trouble with diarrhea and constipation and you have to be careful with what you eat. With a colostomi your stool is like before and you can eat what you want.
                    Ileostomies don't get constipated. In fact, you should not take laxitives if you have an ileostomy, becuase of rapid dehydration that can result from it. If it acts like its constipated, it is most likely a blockage (some things can get stuck and block the flow of output). You can still get diarrhea, just like other people, but its a bit more dangerous for people with ileostomies, due to the rapid fluid loss. You have to compensate by drinking Pedialyte (which I don't see how kids can stand to drink this stuff 'cause its nasty), taking anti-diarrheal medicine, and eating something to thicken the output like peanut butter or applesauce.

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                      #11
                      hosp fri - mon and home alone..only went back to gi to get staples out..

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Dear Summergirl89:

                        If I wouldn't have had to have my sacrum removed, I would have been out of the hospital within 5 days at Hopkins for just the colostomy.

                        I would recommend you go here...great site like the one here for Ostomy questions and feedback from those with Ostomies.

                        http://www.uoaa.org/forum/index.php

                        From what I know, the surgeons want to make sure you can start having a BM before sending you home. You'll have an ostomy nurse while at the hospital who will teach you how to prepare, apply and discard your appliance, along with stoma care. Once your ostomy nurse and surgeon feel you're ready, you'll go home.

                        Do visit the Ostomy Web site to get some various opinions.

                        Peace and God's Blessings...
                        Shane

                        Comment


                          #13
                          You really have to be specific as to whether you had a "traditional" colostomy or a laproscopic one, and if you have a traditional one, why and if it also required a colectomy to know what a reasonable hospitalization would be.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Redo...

                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                            You really have to be specific as to whether you had a "traditional" colostomy or a laproscopic one, and if you have a traditional one, why and if it also required a colostomy to know what a reasonable hospitalization would be.

                            (KLD)
                            Dear SCI-Nurse:

                            I assume you were referring to me. If not, my apologies.
                            1. My sigmoid colostomy was elective. I was going to lose bowel control and had been told by other sacrum amputee patients prior to my sacral amputation for tumor, that most of them had to spend up to an hour, sometimes more, per day, dealing with enemas and "manual manipulation" to have a complete BM. Additionally, sacral amputations are major surgeries of high complexity and the wound incision is very large and runs from the upper middle of your back to the crack of your buttock. Recovery for sacral removal is usually two months in the hospital. I didn't want the added risk of having to deal with feces from my normal plumbing infecting the wound, which is an issue with recovery.
                            2. The surgery was "traditional". It took about three hours from what my wife told me.
                            3. Hospital stay for traditional colostomy surgery, I've been told a week to two, maybe more depending on any complications or the health of the patient. Again, from what I know (and I bet it differs from institution to institution somewhat) if there are no complications and the patient is having regular BMs and understands how to care for the stoma and ostomy, 7 - 14 days. Again, this is just my understanding. I had mine done, and then 3 days later had my major sacral amputation. That was quite an experience, let me tell you, but it saved my life, so I'm grateful.
                            I hope this helps...

                            Peace and God's Blessings...
                            Shaner

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by summergirl89
                              I am seriously thinking of having a colostomy. I was wondering how long you are usually in the hospital and then after you get home what things do you need to do while everything heals and how long is it usually before you can drive, go back to work etc? any info. would be appreciated!
                              When I had my ileostomy, I stayed in the hospital for 7 days (4 of which, I couldn't eat anything because my digestive system hadn't woken up yet). After I was dishcharged from the hospital, I recovered at a local nursing home for a while. While I was in the nursing home, I was taught how to change the ostomy appliances by myself, as well as what foods to eat and what ones to avoid while healing. I changed my appliance every 4 days and drank a lot of fluids everyday. One thing that annoyed me during my recovery was that I couldn't lift any weights to exercise my upper body, so instead, I just wheeled around the nursing home a lot for exercise. Other things they tell you to do is to take it easy for a couple of weeks while the abdominal incision is healing (this way, you avoid getting a hernia or other complications). I sewed, read books, watched TV, and built Lego houses during my recovery (someone had a huge box of Lego's in the activity room, so when I was bored, I'd use them).
                              According to my suregon/doctor, you can start driving 4 weeks after surgery, and I think its after 6-8 weeks you can go back to work. I had to wait about 4 months before I could start any physical therapy that involved lifting weights, due to getting a peri-rectal abcess and a blood clot during recovery. I also had to wait until the drain tube came out before I could ride the bus anywhere, due to the high infection risk.

                              From what I had read on the UOAA Discussion Board (www.uoaa.org), several people have said that its easier to recover if you have a laproscopic surgery rather than a tradition incision surgery (I had the traditional surgery). Plus, depending on how your colostomy is done, the ostomy nurse will teach you how to irrigate the stoma, so you can possibly go bag free for a day (if they take a lot of your colon out, you might not be able to do this, because the higher up you get to your small intestine, the more liquid the stools are).

                              Hope this help you out!

                              Jessie

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