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    DVT still there after 9 months :(

    Hello gang, my name is Evonne and I am new to the site.

    I just had another doppler done on my left leg and i still have a blood clot (DVT) after 8 months. I develpoed it after being totally paralized for 2 months. I am now walking with no assisted devices and am fairly mobile. I am not running 5 miles a day anymore like i used to but oh well i guess i'm up. I took Cumadin for 2 months while in the hospital but i had to have a disectomy to stabalize my neck so i went off the cumadin and a filter was put in place in case a clot broke free. My clot extended from my groin to my knee. The clot is not as big as it used to be and many collateral viens have formed so i am getting good blood flow thru my leg to feet etc. I suppose a clots a clots no matter the size though??

    My question is will my clot ever go away on its own or should i go back on cumadin to help the process..........i figured since i was more active now it would disolve on it's own Taking cumadin was kinda a pain and i would like to avoid if i can ??

    Can the filter i have in place get all clogged because it's been there 4 so long??? Can clots find their way around the filter thru collaterals??

    Thanks 4 any and all help

    Evonne
    I have a spinal cord injury...a spinal cord injury DOES NOT have me!

    walking quad-Central Cord Syndrome

    #2
    I had a large clot too, running from below my knee up into my abdomen. This was probably four months after my injury. I took coumadin for nine months. They never checked it again, but a few months ago I was concerned because my leg seemed more swollen than usual. Another ultrasound showed that blood was moving normally through my leg, so I was glad to get the all clear!

    The leg is always more swollen than the other. It always feels a bit warmer to the touch, too. So if I did get another clot, I'm not sure how I'd know it! I do know that after a large clot, the vein is never the same. The clot doesn't disappear or break up, it just kind of sticks to the walls of the vein and shrinks a bit, and blood eventually pushes its way through the middle of the gunk. This process can take quite a while.

    I've had a filter in since a couple days after my injury. I asked the same thing about the filter getting clogged. I was told that if that happened, both legs would get very swollen and it would be impossible to miss, so I stopped worrying about it. As for clots getting around the filter, I suppose it is possible but again, it's not something I worry about every day. BTW the filter is now a permanent fixture as you probably already know. I've heard different numbers (six weeks, three months, six months at the most) but at some point tissue forms around the edges and it can't be removed. With a history of DVT though that's not necessarily a bad thing.

    I'm surprised you were only on coumadin for two months. You could ask your doctor if you should go back on it. I know it's a pain getting blood drawn every couple weeks but if it helps shrink the clot it's worth it. There are also other drugs you can take long-term to reduce the risk of more clots.

    Comment


      #3
      Going back on the Coumadin now would probably not help any. It is unfortunate that you did not stay on the Coumadin even after the filter was placed, as this does place you at higher risk for developing chronic phlebotic syndrome (chronic swelling due to poor venous and lymphatic drainage). We always continue for 12 months of Coumadin, even if a filter is in place, if someone has a DVT, esp. if they had embolisation as you describe.

      It is likely at this point that the vein in question may never have good blood flow again and you will have to depend on your colateral vessel venous drainage. You may want to see a good vascular surgeon for a second opinion.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #4
        Zero, Evonne, sounds excactly like me. Be careful with coumidin, it had a hand in nearly killing me last fall. I did get my blood taken every month, and it got out of control. I have a filter, and was on coumidin for 2 years because of clots that wouldn't go away, in the legs. I am now off of it, but, take 1-2 asprin a day, and my doctor doesn't want to hear about coumidin ever again. The sad part is coumidin is the only way they get rid of clots. May I never get one again.
        Water could also be a problem, that seems to be my latest endevor. I'm getting a lot of fluid build up with the heat this summer.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Evonne
          Hello gang, my name is Evonne and I am new to the site.

          My question is will my clot ever go away on its own or should i go back on cumadin to help the process..........i figured since i was more active now it would disolve on it's own Taking cumadin was kinda a pain and i would like to avoid if i can ?? Thanks 4 any and all help
          Evonne
          If you want to try something in the Alternative medicine area, suggest you take Lecithin (WalMart), which is a blood lubricator that helps keep the blood platelets from globbing together. I have been taking this twice a day for 12 years with no adverse effects. Also, a Flax, Borage, and Fish Oil combination will help as well as it is an anti-inflamatiory (Rexall brand at WalMart). To unclog your arteries, take calcium disodium EDTA in capsule form which has been around for 80 years and is cheap. You can Google and find this on the Internet. A product called Cardio Clear has the same ingrediants. Go to www.hfn-usa.com This product should be taken at bedtime and at first wakening 2-3 capsules at each time. You should take this for 2 years or so. The product provides free electrons which bond with the plaque in the arteries which the kidneys will then trap. The plaque will then be excreated in your urine.

          Comment


            #6
            Damn, 6shooter, that's better than taking rat poision, since that's all coumidin is.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by alhavel
              Damn, 6shooter, that's better than taking rat poision, since that's all coumidin is.
              Take too much Coumadin and you will bleed to death.

              I have taken 10cc's of calcium disodium EDTA in shot form in an artery once a week for 7 weeks and didn't even get a headache!! BTW, it also got the LEAD out!!
              Last edited by 6 Shooter; 14 Aug 2008, 11:15 AM.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                developing chronic phlebotic syndrome (chronic swelling due to poor venous and lymphatic drainage). We always continue for 12 months of Coumadin, even if a filter is in place, if someone has a DVT, esp. if they had embolisation as you describe.


                (KLD)
                i had to go off of cumadin so i could have my neck surgery......after surgery they did not put me back on cumadin. Do i still need to be concered about CBS as mentioned above?? I wear a ted hose on that leg about everyday to keep swelling down and it looks pretty good. If u look hard u can see my lf leg is slightly bigger than my rt.

                Evonne
                I have a spinal cord injury...a spinal cord injury DOES NOT have me!

                walking quad-Central Cord Syndrome

                Comment


                  #9
                  Yes, Coumadin is rat poison, but that does not make it a bad drug. Be careful with herbal remedies. They can be just as likely to cause serious bleeding.

                  Neurontin was originally an insecticide. Digitalis (used extensively in heart disease) and belladona (used in everything from eye surgery and treatment of glacoma to management of various cardiac conditions) were both popular poisons in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. That does not make their APPROPRIATE medical use wrong. Lots of drugs can be used wrong, and can be dangerous in the wrong conditions, combined with other drugs or herbs, or used in too high of a dose.

                  While Coumadin must be taken properly, and with some precautions, it is an important and useful drug. While bleeding from over-dosage or trauma while on it is a concern, prior to the extensive us of both LMWH (such as Levonox) and Coumadin, I had a number of young, otherwise healthy SCI patients who dropped dead from pulmonary emboli, often right during their rehab or shortly thereafter. I don't want to have to see that again either. There are clinical practice guidelines on the prevention and management of DVT in people with SCI (you can get a copy from the "sticky topics" at the top of this forum) and these should be universally used by physicians and othr clinicians who care for those with SCI. Malpractice cases have been based on these, and won.

                  As I said above, I would see a good vascular surgeon and ask for their recommendations for your current late management of your DVT.

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    My last, and hopefully final fight with DVT I went to a Vascular surgeon, and he gave me coumadin, and also Perscription stockings, being that I already had the filter from the accident, during the 8 week coma. The stockings I still use for the water problems I have in the feet.
                    Coumadin and other types of blood thinners must be monitered carefully. Mine were and it it still went astray.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                      Yes, Coumadin is rat poison, but that does not make it a bad drug.

                      Be careful with herbal remedies. They can be just as likely to cause serious bleeding.

                      While Coumadin must be taken properly, and with some precautions, it is an important and useful drug. While bleeding from over-dosage or trauma while on it is a concern, prior to the extensive us of both LMWH (such as Levonox) and Coumadin, I had a number of young, otherwise healthy SCI patients who dropped dead from pulmonary emboli, often right during their rehab or shortly thereafter. (KLD)
                      Hmmm, herbal remedies have not killed anyone, but "extensive us of both LMWH (such as Levonox) and Coumadin" has. The choice seems clear.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Actually, herbal remedies can also be fatal it not used correctly. You need to be careful with them as well.

                        Just saying.
                        T7-8 since Feb 2005

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by 6 Shooter
                          Hmmm, herbal remedies have not killed anyone, but "extensive us of both LMWH (such as Levonox) and Coumadin" has. The choice seems clear.
                          Your encyclopedic knowledge of herbal remedies really is impressive, but you actually weaken your case for them with statements like this. Are you absolutely certain not a single person in recorded history has died from an herbal overdose? Are you positive nobody has ever refused a pharmaceutical for a serious illness, tried an herbal remedy instead, then died when the pharmaceutical would almost certainly have saved them [statistically speaking]?

                          Seems to me the best approach to drugs vs. herbs is a balanced one, with plenty of research and healthy skepticism either way.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Zero
                            Seems to me the best approach to drugs vs. herbs is a balanced one, with plenty of research and healthy skepticism either way.
                            I couldn't agree more. Although would like to comment that vitamins are not "herbs" and neither are trace minerals.

                            Would also like to point out that the toxic dosages for supplements is something amounting huge numbers of pills where someone is trying to kill oneself with handfuls. You cannot say that for any prescription medication.

                            Comment

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