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Treadmill training after spinal cord injury: It's not just about the walking.

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    Treadmill training after spinal cord injury: It's not just about the walking.

    J Rehabil Res Dev. 2008;45(2):241-8.

    Treadmill training after spinal cord injury: It's not just about the walking.

    Hicks AL, Martin Ginis KA.

    Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada. hicksal@mcmaster.ca.

    Body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) is being used throughout the world as a method for improving functional ambulation after spinal cord injury (SCI). This therapy, however, is very labor-intensive, and recent evidence suggests that it may not be superior to other more conventional forms of rehabilitation for improving locomotor ability. Recognizing that the value of BWSTT may extend well beyond its potential to improve functional ambulation is important, and the physiological and psychological benefits associated with this whole-body upright exercise may justify its use in both the acute and chronic SCI populations.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum
    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

    #2
    although this study found treadmill training may not be superior to other therapies, I wonder if a study has looked into using electronic stimulation in combination with BWSTT? I've heard so often about the psychological benefits of upright therapy, it would be amazing if something like electronic stimulation could help it to really improve locomotor function.
    I followed the link and after looking around a little I came across a study involving electrical therapy for stroke survivors, but not anything on SCI survivors.
    I did find more info on electronic stimulation therapy for SCI survivors here:
    http://www.brainandspinalcord.org/bl...urvivors-walk/

    Comment


      #3
      Below are links to a few abstracts on FES assisted gait.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum


      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum
      “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

      Comment


        #4
        Spinal cord injury: present and future therapeutic devices and prostheses.

        Neurotherapeutics. 2008 Jan;5(1):147-62.

        Spinal cord injury: present and future therapeutic devices and prostheses.

        Giszter SF.

        Neurobiology and Anatomy, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19129, USA. sg33@drexel.edu

        A range of passive and active devices are under development or are already in clinical use to partially restore function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Prosthetic devices to promote host tissue regeneration and plasticity and reconnection are under development, comprising bioengineered bridging materials free of cells. Alternatively, artificial electrical stimulation and robotic bridges may be used, which is our focus here. A range of neuroprostheses interfacing either with CNS or peripheral nervous system both above and below the lesion are under investigation and are at different stages of development or translation to the clinic. In addition, there are orthotic and robotic devices which are being developed and tested in the laboratory and clinic that can provide mechanical assistance, training or substitution after SCI. The range of different approaches used draw on many different aspects of our current but limited understanding of neural regeneration and plasticity, and spinal cord function and interactions with the cortex. The best therapeutic practice will ultimately likely depend on combinations of these approaches and technologies and on balancing the combined effects of these on the biological mechanisms and their interactions after injury. An increased understanding of plasticity of brain and spinal cord, and of the behavior of innate modular mechanisms in intact and injured systems, will likely assist in future developments. We review the range of device designs under development and in use, the basic understanding of spinal cord organization and plasticity, the problems and design issues in device interactions with the nervous system, and the possible benefits of active motor devices.

        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum
        “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

        Comment


          #5
          thank you for the link and information, that is exactly what I was looking for. I see the participants were all more than 3 months post-injury, but I didn't see if they were under a certain timeframe. This combination therapy could possibly be started a year or more post-injury?

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