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Collagen scaffold combined with huCMS

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    Collagen scaffold combined with huCMS

    Abstract


    Currently, there is no effective strategy to promote functional recovery after a spinal cord injury. Collagen scaffolds can not only provide support and guidance for axonal regeneration, but can also serve as a bridge for nerve regeneration at the injury site. They can additionally be used as carriers to retain mesenchymal stem cells at the injury site to enhance their effectiveness. Hence, we hypothesized that transplanting human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells on collagen scaffolds would enhance healing following acute complete spinal cord injury. Here, we test this hypothesis through animal studies and a phase I clinical trial. (1) Animal experiments: Models of completely transected spinal cord injury were established in rats and canines by microsurgery. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from neonatal umbilical cord tissue were adsorbed onto collagen scaffolds and surgically implanted at the injury site in rats and canines; the animals were observed after 1 week–6 months. The transplantation resulted in increased motor scores, enhanced amplitude and shortened latency of the motor evoked potential, and reduced injury area as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. (2) Phase I clinical trial: Forty patients with acute complete cervical injuries were enrolled at the Characteristic Medical Center of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force and divided into two groups. The treatment group (n = 20) received collagen scaffolds loaded with mesenchymal stem cells derived from neonatal umbilical cord tissues; the control group (n = 20) did not receive the stem-cell loaded collagen implant. All patients were followed for 12 months. In the treatment group, the American Spinal Injury Association scores and activities of daily life scores were increased, bowel and urinary functions were recovered, and residual urine volume was reduced compared with the pre-treatment baseline. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging showed that new nerve fiber connections were formed, and diffusion tensor imaging showed that electrophysiological activity was recovered after the treatment. No serious complication was observed during follow-up. In contrast, the neurological functions of the patients in the control group were not improved over the follow-up period. The above data preliminarily demonstrate that the transplantation of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells on a collagen scaffold can promote the recovery of neurological function after acute spinal cord injury. In the future, these results need to be confirmed in a multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial with a larger sample size. The clinical trial was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Characteristic Medical Center of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force on February 3, 2016 (approval No. PJHEC-2016-A8). All animal experiments were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Characteristic Medical Center of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force on May 20, 2015 (approval No. PJHEC-2015-D5).

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7437585/
    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005
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