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    #46
    This is an old thread and it's not a current movie, but I watched Million Dollar Baby yesterday evening. I had no idea SCI played a role in the story. It's definitely NOT a good film for a quad to watch just before bedtime. It wasn't the ending that bothered me the most, but rather the injustice of how the injury happened. It bothered me all night.

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      #47
      Yeah, Million Dollar Baby is depressing.

      Saw Life on DVD about a week ago. One of the crew on the space station is a para and he gets to be the 1st aboard to be killed by the alien life. There were a couple of scenes where you could see this para enjoying moving in a weightless environment. Not only was the gimp 1st to die in this scary movie but he was also black and as we all know blacks always die 1st in scary movies.

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        #48
        Originally posted by ancientgimp View Post
        Yeah, Million Dollar Baby is depressing.

        Saw Life on DVD about a week ago. One of the crew on the space station is a para and he gets to be the 1st aboard to be killed by the alien life. There were a couple of scenes where you could see this para enjoying moving in a weightless environment. Not only was the gimp 1st to die in this scary movie but he was also black and as we all know blacks always die 1st in scary movies.
        lol sorry just read your comment and it gave me a little laugh because it's 100% true . Between being black and disabled in a scary movie you know that character isn't goin to last long at all haha

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          #49
          Kevin Ogar's story just came out recently. Crossfit lifting accident. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25yrrCCA1bM

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            #50
            interesting article about disability in film and new films...
            https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...out-disability

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              #51
              Going to see a sneak preview of Breathe tomorrow...will post a brief review of it here (polio, not traumatic SCI).

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                #52

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                  #53
                  I saw Breathe Monday night, thought it was pretty good. Andrew Garfield did an excellent job, and the rest of the cast were excellent as well, including Claire Foy as his wife and Tom Hollander who played both parts of his twin brothers-in-law. John Cavendish, the son of Robin, was one of the producers of this film.

                  Did not know the story of this man, Robin Cavendish, but I think the claim at the end of the film that he was the longest lived vent dependent polio survivor (termed a responaut in the film) living outside an institution at the time of his death is not correct. He was 28 in 1958 when he contracted polio, and died in 1994. Ed Roberts contracted polio at age 14 in 1953, and died in 1995, and I don't think he was necessarily the longest lived either.

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Cavendish

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                    #54
                    Strongly recommend Crip Camp, a Netflix streamed documentary about Camp Jened, a shabby camp in the Catskills for disabled teens in the early 70's. The counselors were hippies and older disabled youth. The freedom and acceptance found there inspired a generation of disabled activists. The film follows the campers as they later protest for approval of the Rehab Act of 1973, blockading the streets of Manhattan, sitting in at the HEW offices in California. The film follows the life of Judy Heumann, a polio survivor, power chair user and at times the lifeforce of the disability rights movement. The next time you use a curb cut, board a bus via lift, enter an accessible university building, fly without bringing your "attendant", thank Judy, a former Camp Jened counselor. My wife and I appear in several scenes, once in a disabled encounter group and the briefly in scenes of the blockade of the streets outside the Nixon reelection headquarters. My wife was a member of Disabled in Action which Judy ran like a general from her Brooklyn apartment. The film is produced by Michelle and Barack Obama and won best documentary at the Sundance Film Festival. Bring tissues.

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                      #55
                      ancientgimp, thanks for that summary of this film. I have already planned to watch it this weekend, but will have much more appreciation of the film from your review. I'll watch for you too!

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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