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    #16
    Originally posted by -scott- View Post
    It's a great idea, but it's an adaptation for specific needs. Labeling it "universal design" is a misnomer.
    It is a permanent fixture that replaces the existing seat..it is a permanent alteration, not an adaptation..therefore I believe it would qualify as a "Universal Design" toilet.
    Last edited by sherocksandsherolls; 13 Apr 2013, 11:18 AM.
    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

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      #17
      Originally posted by sherocksandsherolls View Post
      It is a permanent fixture that replaces the existing seat..it is a permanent alteration, not a adaptation..therefore I believe it is "Universal Design".
      The universe is permanent. The alteration is permanent, therefor it is universal!


      Ducks float, wood floats, therefor ducks are made of wood!

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        #18
        Originally posted by sherocksandsherolls View Post
        It is a permanent fixture that replaces the existing seat..it is a permanent alteration, not an adaptation..therefore I believe it would qualify as a "Universal Design" toilet.
        Hand controls are adaptations to vehicles, even though they're bolted on and deemed "permanent." They, like a toilet seat, can be removed.

        Universal design often gets confused with accessible design. Universal design is about access and usability for everyone, regardless if a disability is present or not.

        Litmus test: would this toilet seat be practical for every home on your street?

        I'm on the way out the door, but I'll jump back in later...

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          #19
          Originally posted by t8burst View Post
          The universe is permanent. The alteration is permanent, therefor it is universal!


          Ducks float, wood floats, therefor ducks are made of wood!
          :golfclap:

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by -scott- View Post
            Hand controls are adaptations to vehicles, even though they're bolted on and deemed "permanent." They, like a toilet seat, can be removed.

            Universal design often gets confused with accessible design. Universal design is about access and usability for everyone, regardless if a disability is present or not.

            Litmus test: would this toilet seat be practical for every home on your street?

            I'm on the way out the door, but I'll jump back in later...
            Sorry, maybe I need to try it, but I don't think it's even practical in my home, just more surface to keep clean.
            I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Stephen6s View Post
              ...Individuals who perform lateral transfers from wheelchairs need a large, strong and stable platform ...
              On that point I would agree but you have only scratched the surface with that. Your demonstrators have pretty good mobility. I think you will find that most residential toilets are not fastened to the floor sufficiently to withstand the rigors of a heavier patient with a more difficult transfer. I already went way beyond your solution with a rigid bench around the toilet. Attached to it was a pivoting transfer board that my wife could swing into place without fear it would slide off the toilet. It provided as smooth a plane as possible from the seat to the chair.
              Your wings will be too low to be of use for many. I would suggest an actual handle that can be rotated up and locked to provide a firm hand hold above the plane of the seat. Make it so it can be lowered out of the way as needed.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by -scott- View Post
                It's a great idea, but it's an adaptation for specific needs. Labeling it "universal design" is a misnomer.
                Agreed. There is no universal other than build with provisions to make it easy to modify. In 20 years caring for a spouse with progressive MS I've seen the transition from cane to walker to manual chair with standing to transfer boards, to power chair to lifts to lifts an BP. At this point give me a low profile toilet in the middle of a large roll-in shower and a commode chair with ROHO cushion.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Hi Nonoise,

                  Thanks for taking time to look and comment on WINGMAN.

                  I hope you will try it. You're right, it does have more surface to clean.
                  However the grips on the wings extend beyond the basin and are shielded
                  by the urethane bumpers so they don't get splashed.

                  My mother was a strong woman. 13 years ago she fell off a regular round toilet seat.
                  Two weeks later, she passed away. I don't know if the fall was the cause of merely a symptom. I do know that she wasn't feeling good the day she fell, it hurt her, it scared her and she was embarrassed to tell anyone but me.

                  My father, wore the paint off the front and sides of the same toilet seat pushing off it while recoveryiing from back surgery at the age of 85.

                  However, when I sent him WINGMAN, he told me, "I don't need that seat Steve, it's for invalids, I can get up and down just fine, using it will make my legs weak". I hate that word invalids, I think it should be struck from the English language.

                  Nonetheless, I sent the seat. I had someone mount it for him. At first, he refused to use the palming and grip surfaces.

                  Later I found that there were times when he was ill or weak or had trouble sleeping and in these cases he would use the supports.

                  Finally, he conceded that they were just convenient, and he used them as a standard practice, just as he would push on a couch cushion when lowering and raising.

                  Near the end of his life, there were two occasions when he started to fall when lowering to the toilet.

                  Thank God, that he was well practiced at reaching back with his hands for the wings, because they were in place to catch himself.

                  He explained to me that in other standing falls, he could not react fast enough to get his hands in position to lessen his injuries. He typically landed on his face. I have horrible pictures of the results of these falls. But no picture, can capture the full pain which is not just physical but psychological as well.

                  However, because his hands were already in place to catch his fall as a result of habit using WINGMAN. He didn't have to move them to catch his instability when lowering to the toilet seat; they were already in position. The second time he lost his balance when lowering, he started to fall over the side. Fortunately, WINGMAN is 24 inches wide. That is 12" from centerline to the edge of the WING. Building codes dictate that toilets be mounted 15" from centerline to a wall or other fixture such as a bathtub or shower. This left only 3" between WINGMAN's wings and the adjacent shower and wall so he couldnt fall off.

                  Talk to any Fireman and he will tell you stories of the number of people they retrieve from being trapped in the space between the wall and the toilet basin.

                  My father passed away Feb 10th at the age of 91. He aged in place. Although, he was reluctant at first to accept WINGMAN, within the first week he liked to brag to people about his toilet seat.

                  I may never achieve the commercial success, I've hoped for with WINGMAN. But, If I've done nothing more than preventing my father from falling off the toilet seat and injurying himself to the point that he was forced to move from his home into long term care... well I guess it's already a success.

                  Dear Sir, if you are still using a standard toilet seat, I believe WINGMAN would be of great advantage to you. However, you will always be the best judge of your needs.

                  Thanks again for joining the discussion.

                  P.S. Neither my father or his girlfriend ever complained about cleaning WINGMAN.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Thanks for this insight. I really want to get one of these for my step-Father who is in his 80's and rather unstable, falling a lot and on toilet often.

                    I think you have a great product idea here.

                    Originally posted by Stephen6s View Post
                    Hi Nonoise,

                    Thanks for taking time to look and comment on WINGMAN.

                    I hope you will try it. You're right, it does have more surface to clean.
                    However the grips on the wings extend beyond the basin and are shielded
                    by the urethane bumpers so they don't get splashed.

                    My mother was a strong woman. 13 years ago she fell off a regular round toilet seat.
                    Two weeks later, she passed away. I don't know if the fall was the cause of merely a symptom. I do know that she wasn't feeling good the day she fell, it hurt her, it scared her and she was embarrassed to tell anyone but me.

                    My father, wore the paint off the front and sides of the same toilet seat pushing off it while recoveryiing from back surgery at the age of 85.

                    However, when I sent him WINGMAN, he told me, "I don't need that seat Steve, it's for invalids, I can get up and down just fine, using it will make my legs weak". I hate that word invalids, I think it should be struck from the English language.

                    Nonetheless, I sent the seat. I had someone mount it for him. At first, he refused to use the palming and grip surfaces.

                    Later I found that there were times when he was ill or weak or had trouble sleeping and in these cases he would use the supports.

                    Finally, he conceded that they were just convenient, and he used them as a standard practice, just as he would push on a couch cushion when lowering and raising.

                    Near the end of his life, there were two occasions when he started to fall when lowering to the toilet.

                    Thank God, that he was well practiced at reaching back with his hands for the wings, because they were in place to catch himself.

                    He explained to me that in other standing falls, he could not react fast enough to get his hands in position to lessen his injuries. He typically landed on his face. I have horrible pictures of the results of these falls. But no picture, can capture the full pain which is not just physical but psychological as well.

                    However, because his hands were already in place to catch his fall as a result of habit using WINGMAN. He didn't have to move them to catch his instability when lowering to the toilet seat; they were already in position. The second time he lost his balance when lowering, he started to fall over the side. Fortunately, WINGMAN is 24 inches wide. That is 12" from centerline to the edge of the WING. Building codes dictate that toilets be mounted 15" from centerline to a wall or other fixture such as a bathtub or shower. This left only 3" between WINGMAN's wings and the adjacent shower and wall so he couldnt fall off.

                    Talk to any Fireman and he will tell you stories of the number of people they retrieve from being trapped in the space between the wall and the toilet basin.

                    My father passed away Feb 10th at the age of 91. He aged in place. Although, he was reluctant at first to accept WINGMAN, within the first week he liked to brag to people about his toilet seat.

                    I may never achieve the commercial success, I've hoped for with WINGMAN. But, If I've done nothing more than preventing my father from falling off the toilet seat and injurying himself to the point that he was forced to move from his home into long term care... well I guess it's already a success.

                    Dear Sir, if you are still using a standard toilet seat, I believe WINGMAN would be of great advantage to you. However, you will always be the best judge of your needs.

                    Thanks again for joining the discussion.

                    P.S. Neither my father or his girlfriend ever complained about cleaning WINGMAN.
                    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Anyone who would like to purchase a WINGMAN can contact me
                      at Stephen@axs-wingman.com or (720) 480-4105.

                      WINGMAN is not a injected molded plastic toilet seat.

                      Common toilet seats are injected molded and their centers are filled with recycled plastic to avoid violating the wall thickness constraints of the process.
                      Bottom-line, this process creates a toilet seat that is very weak.

                      This is why toilet seats break so easily or become loose. Many are entirely made of plastic. Including the hinge and fastening bolts and nuts.

                      WINGMAN achieves it's strength from a Structural (RIM) Reactive in Mold Material formulated in Germany. The oversize compliant bumpers and grips are made from strong chemical resistant urethane (RIM). The oversize hinge base is cast aluminum and the majority of the other components within the hinge are stainless steel.

                      The evidence of the strength of the seat can be viewed at www.AXS-WINGMAN.com

                      Unfortunately these materials come at a significant cost and place WINGMAN at a price point that can't compete with the plastic toilet seats on Home Depot's shelf.

                      However that was never my goal. My goal was to create the toilet seat dearly needed by millions Americans, but was not available at any price.

                      Our standard retail price is $349.00. However, I have four WINGMAN seats that are functionally perfect, but have very minor cosmetic blemishes, primarily beneath the seat.
                      I will sell these WINGMAN seats for $100.00 off or $249.00.

                      This offer is specifically for members of the SCI CareCure community.
                      Last edited by Stephen6s; 15 Apr 2013, 12:13 PM. Reason: Line inadvertantly deleted

                      Comment

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